How to Write a Marketing Resume That Will Stand Out in 2018

What to add to have a winning marketing resume:

If you’re looking to land a career as a marketer, you need a resume that turns heads to get you in the door, here are the important factors to keep in mind.

  • Make sure it’s a one-pager
  • Name drop any impressive brands you’ve worked at or with in any capacity.
  • Scan the role responsibilities section of the job post
  • See what you have done before that can be closely re-framed in terms of the job post
  • Include a strong bio that is down-to-earth, and sheds light on your personal hobbies as much as your professional interests
  • Don’t be vague. Always focus on numbers and results.
  • Highlight your highest education, or the most prestigious business-related institution you studied at
  • Talk about your collaborative and team-player nature.
  • Focus on the facts and insights that very clearly separate you from other marketers.

It’s clear why everybody needs marketers, they are the lifeline of any business to continue thriving and attracting more customers. Ironically enough, marketers, who tell stories for a living, may often find it challenging to tell a story about themselves.
Worry not, we’ve studied marketers carefully to understand how best they are able to tell a compelling and effective story through their resume about who they are, what they have done, and subsequently - what they can do.
Today we present you with the definitive guide on how to market a marketer’s resume in 2018.
Now you may be applying for one particular job, or several. You may be applying through LinkedIn, on their website, or through a referral. In all cases, getting access does not mean getting the job. That’s why we want to make sure you are prepared with as much information as possible, based on our learnings working with marketers.
Here’s what we’re going to cover:

  • A. How to write a marketing resume (the 5 sage advices to keep in mind)
  • B. The 10 things recruiters and hiring managers are looking for in a Marketing resume
  • C. How to get a referral on LinkedIn for the Marketing role you want (even if you don’t know anyone there!)
Read on.
Looking for a job-specific resume? Check out some of our proven examples here:
You see a job opening in a dream company you’re always fantasised about working at. Reading the title you start to think “hmm, I bet I can be a marketing manager. You marketing manager you! My name sounds like a marketing manager already”
Panic ensues.
We want someone with 5-6 years Full funnel conversion
The ideal candidate will have had 3-4 years of marketing automation experience.
Ideally someone who managed a team of SEO strategy leading deep backlink analysis
Before you give up, remember - recruiters have a term called “purple squirrel” - which is a made up candidate. A unicorn of sorts. Essentially, someone that’s too good to be true. Often times recruiters (and hiring managers specifically) shoot for the moon to set the bar naturally high and see what comes in.

Best Marketing resume examples by users who got hired

How to write a marketing resume

1. Begin with the end in mind (aka focus on the job spec)

Don’t let not having “5-6 years experience” stop you. We’ll show you how.
Reverse engineer what the job spec has to match things you’ve done before. If you have not done it before, try to find a commonality between what you’ve done in the past, and any transferable skills or qualities that would be instrumental to the success of the job.
As with marketing, you want to understand who your target “persona” is.
In this case, it’s the recruiter and hiring manager. It naturally starts with a recruiter. If you put yourself in the place of the recruiter, that person has a target over their head, and are looking for mental shortcuts in the resumes they scan in order to shortlist the ones they believe could be a good fit for the role.
With that in perspective, it goes without saying that this seemingly daunting job spec should instead become your best friend. We recommend:

  • 1. Open a new Google Doc, copy the job spec there.
  • 2. Create a free Enhancv resume.
  • 3. While you have them open side by side, space out each bullet point on the job spec in your Google Doc, listing below each point any past life, work, or marketing-specific experience (doesn’t matter if you think it’s un-related, trust your intuition) that may have some commonality with what they are looking for. The magic word is commonality.
  • 4. For the ones that you have an answer that you’re more or less satisfied with, add those to your Enhancv and begin designing.

2. Make it a One-Pager

Don’t worry about squeezing it all in, rather, think of it as making a “greatest hits” list of your achievements.
Think of your resume as a trailer, a trailer for the Hollywood blockbuster that is you (seriously, you need to sell yourself - this is marketing). I mention this to highlight that you don’t need to “back up” everything you write in detail - that’s what the interview is for.
Besides, who can possibly judge you based on a piece of paper? This is but a ticket into the company’s front doors for your interview.
You may include where you had your highest education qualification, or where you’ve spent the most time working.
Depending on the seniority of the role, if you believe they’re looking for someone who’s going to stay and grow their career in that company, then you should only highlight roles where you have spent 1 or more years, you get the idea.
For instance, you may leave out internships, part-time roles, and other commitments that do not show longevity from a first look. Companies are jealous like that, and they want to know you’re in it for the long-haul.

3. Name Drop early on to get attention

What brands have you worked with (including your ex-employer) that the recruiter and hiring manager would recognize?
Keep in mind that the recruiter is not some mystical higher being, but a person just like me and you.
They also have targets to hit, and people to report to. With that in mind, how can you make the recruiter’s job easier by highlighting certain clients, projects, institutions, or ex-employers you’ve worked with?

4. Focus on what makes you, you.

Fluff aside, this is really important. I sound like a broken record now, but it all originates with the persona.
Do you know how many jobs recruiters have to fill at any one time? They’re typically looking to hit their target of closing headcount for the marketing team before end of the month or quarter.
You need to give them a clear signal that this is someone that would impress the hiring manager, who would in turn make the recruiter look impressive.
Subsequently, the recruiter may be praised for having a “good eye”, and so on.
Provided you give off a good impression of having the right skill set that matches the role, a marketing role is all about collaboration and communication, both internally and externally depending on the role.
It is your job (no pun intended) to show how you will stand out as a person, or more specifically, as a personality. What do you like to do outside of work? Do you have anything quirky that is likely to set you apart from the average joe applying for the same role?
The quirkier the better in marketing.

5. Leave them wanting more

There really is an art to writing resumes. You should never approach your resume as a prescription of who you are (see “Make it a one pager” above), the goal is always to write the kind of things that will make them want to bring you in for an interview.
The goal of the resume is to get you noticed, and get you in the door.
When you write your achievements, focus on the what and the results, but never talk about the how.
Naturally, there may be some items you mention where you have experience in but do not necessarily have a tangible project with a start and end date to illustrate your experience there.
This is the kind of stuff you should leave out until they bring it up in the interview, for you can prepare for this separately.

What 10 things recruiters and hiring managers are looking for in a Marketing resume

When it comes to writing your resume, here are 10 sections to keep in mind and how to address them.

1. Summary
2. Experience
3. Most Proud Of
4. Industry Expertise
5. Technologies
6. Strengths
7. My Time
8. Certifications
9. Education
10. Languages

1. Summary

Remember when we talked about putting yourself in the place of the recruiter? This is the time to do it. Write your summary in the first person, and do not start with “I”. Rather, jump straight into it by writing the job position.
For example “Marketing manager with X years of experience”. If the job title is one you’ve never held before, you may generalise. A great tactic here is to use the word “professional”.
In practice this would be “marketing professional with X years of experience” or similarly, “content marketing professional with experience working for Brand A, Brand B, and Brand C”.

Resume Section

2. Your Experience

Don’t skip this one. I know you’re going to add your experience, but here’s how to write it. Make sure to list your experiences in order of recency, and be very accurate start with power words such as:

  • Spearheaded
  • Led
  • Organised
  • Coached
  • Executed
  • Delivered
  • Developed
  • Achieved
Make sure to apply the name drop technique above, or to focus on results that can be quantified. This can be things such as the marketing budget amount you managed, the % growth or increase on a KPI you delivered, or growing a number your past company carried about from X to Y, and so on.

Resume Section

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3. Most Proud Of

I like to put this one in the top right corner so it stands out. In the Most Proud of Section, you can “feature” a specific project or specific achievement that you have done that is not necessarily the norm.
By the way, this could be work-related, or if you are creative, could be personal-related, which infers transferable skills.
For example, if you’ve achieved a challenging persona feat, say climbing a mountain, this says a lot about your work ethic and persistence. This is another of those sections where you write it with the hiring manager in mind.

Resume Section

4. Industry Expertise

This one should be a lay-up for you. Simply take the industry that the company you’re applying for is in, and make sure to mention that, alongside any other industries you may have worked in.
For example, if you’re applying for a marketing job in a tech company, and your background is in media. You may write your industry expertise as Tech, Media, B2C - since all 3 can be related.
The key idea here is to take the industry you’re applying into, and marry that with any other industries you have already participated in.

Resume Section

5. Technologies

For us marketers, long gone are the days of madmen, where all you needed was the right idea. Today, marketers and technologists are often interchanged, and this section is your chance to show that you are in the know.
I recommend adding any marketing technologies you have worked with, as well as any project management or collaboration tools. Make sure not to mention “obvious” tools, as this may give off a since of incompetence. Some tools you may mention (if you’re familiar with working with them) are:

  • Marketing: Hubspot, Mailchimp, Sprout Social, Buffer, Marketo, etc.
  • CRM: Salesforce, Hubspot CRM, Zoho CRM
  • Ads: Facebook Ads, Google Ads, LinkedIn ads
  • Analytics: Google Analytics

Resume Section

6. Strengths

Largely speaking, marketers come in 2 flavours - artistic and scientific. Artistic folks are the ones on the content creation spectrum of marketing, crafting good copy, writing blog posts, creating rich media assets for download, and so on.
Scientific marketers are the ones who enjoy looking at analytics, taking care of SEO optimisations, building automation and nurturing programs, identifying funnel bottlenecks, and the likes.
You may be asking yourself, which one is better? The short answer is both are equally important. The long answer is, one tends to overpower the other depending on the company and role you are applying into.
To cover your base across the board, use the Strengths section to highlight both data-driven and artistic sides of you.
If I had to pick one, in today’s day and age - it would be data driven. But stand out from the crowd by highlighting your attributes across both. Some strengths include:

  • Analytics Processing
  • Problem Solving
  • Trend Management
  • Data-driven
  • Team Player
  • Creativity
  • Customer Experience Management

Resume Section

7. My Time

This is your opportunity to focus on building rapport and a work-life balance image of your lifestyle. Feel free to include what you enjoy to do outside of work here.
I would say dedicate 40% to personal pastimes, and 60% to work-related activities that you’ve typically focused on previously. This could include link-building, team management, trend spotting, content writing, account management, and so on.
If you need advice for a marketing job you’re preparing to apply for, simply hit us up in the chat and we would be glad to walk you through it.

Resume Section

8. Certifications

If you have professional certifications that could be relevant to this role, this is where they go.
If you do not have any certifications, I recommend you head over to Hubspot.com to check out their academy and free inbound marketing certifications - a great way to instantly build credibility on your resume in a respectable fashion.
Other certifications could be online or offline courses you completed in marketing, digital marketing, project management, so on and so forth.

Resume Section

9. Education

Similar to certifications from an academic front, this is the time to highlight your highest academic achievement in college, university, or equivalent.
This is an especially important section if you can highlight a dissertation, or job-related project that may put you on top of the pack.
If you run out of space, and don’t have any particulars to highlight, then the Education section is one you can choose to leave out - as it’s not as important as some of the others mentioned here.

Resume Section

10. Languages

This is always an excellent one to highlight if you are bilingual (or more!) If you do have languages, it could be good to give it a mention in your summary section as well.

Resume Section

How to get a referral on LinkedIn for the Marketing role you want

Check out our complete guide to getting job referrals for more actionable tips.
Generally speaking, you want to go on LinkedIn and search your 1st and 2nd degree contacts to see if anyone you are connected to is currently working for this company.
If not, you may do a LinkedIn groups search on marketing groups, where people from that company may be members.
You may then reach out to them expressing that you are both members of so and so group, and that you’re currently interested in applying for a role at their company, if they have any advice - and if they may be able to help with a referral.

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