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Welcome to our blog! Here, you'll read our thoughts, tips, and lessons learned from five years of building resumes to feel proud of.

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Career Growth
Expert Guide on How to Get a Job at a Nonprofit

Do you want to spend your days working toward a cause you care about deeply? If you find fulfillment in helping others, acts of generosity, or making the world a better place, working at a non-profit may be a great fit for you. Their mission is often to build awareness about something important or to benefit members of your community Working with nonprofits will give you the opportunity to use your skills and talents for the sake of the greater good. They’re a great place to develop skills and experiences you otherwise might not. One of the things non-profits often can’t do is pay market rate for the work they need - it’s part of the whole giving to the community aspect of them! (More on that later) But, you’ll often find you can get in the door there with a little less experience or skill than you’d need in other professional settings. So whether you’re interested in helping people, or if you’re looking for a great way to build your professional skills and experience, working with a non-profit can be an amazing option. If you’re wondering how to get a job at a nonprofit, or are considering your job options in general, we can help. Our [career counseling](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/) service will fast-track to success along your career path. We’ve helped thousands of people succeed in their [job search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/), [prep for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), [negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of their contracts, and otherwise [hit their career targets](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/). Get in touch with us If you want to do a deep dive on informational interviews, or if you're curious about other ways to better navigate your career path. What IS a Non-Profit? A nonprofit is an organization (or company) that operates to provide benefits to the public and/or furthers a cause. The groups they benefit can be small and specific, like working to raise awareness and cure a rare disease, or for the larger good, like reducing pollution in a city, state, or nationally. The causes they work toward are usually either social or environmental, but could be for other efforts too. In the US and Canada, non-profits get a tax-exempt status because of their commitment to provide services to the public. As a result, they operate with lower costs, but they have to direct much of their funding (and all of what would otherwise be profit, hence ‘non-profit’) to their causes. Traditionally, nonprofits are funded by the government or public donors, and don’t earn much of their operating budgets directly in return for their work. There are exceptions though, and a newer model, called a ‘social enterprise’, makes money off their services or products, but they still put that money back into their social efforts. Benefits of Working at a Non-profit (and some drawbacks!) Interest piqued? Have you started wondering whether working at a non-profit is for you? Well, there are some benefits to working at one that you may not have considered. There are also a few drawbacks we hear about it, too. Read on and judge for yourself whether non-profits offer what you’d want (or need) in your next job. How to Get a Job at a Nonprofit: 6 Pro Tips There’s no one right way to get a job at a non-profit. Some people find themselves at non-profits after stepping back from other highly successful careers in private industry. Other people start working at non-profits as the first ‘real’ job they’ve ever had. If it’s your goal to get into a nonprofit, though, there are a few things you can do no matter where you are in your career that will help open the door to that opportunity. Here’s the best-kept-secret tips you need to know to get a job in a nonprofit. 1: Volunteer Your first and best, but probably not your last step, will be to volunteer. You should start doing this early, and can direct it anywhere as a first step. Because they often have limited funds, many nonprofits need people who can give of their time and resources to further the cause. So even if there isn’t a paid position at the organization you want to work at, you can get to them and show them what you offer by volunteering with them. It will be much easier to get a paid position for a company you’ve already proved yourself willing to do a great job for free when the time comes! And volunteering is a great low-risk way to see whether the organization is a good fit for you and your goals. Even if you can’t find a position with the exact company you want to work with, volunteer somewhere. No matter where you volunteer, it’s going to look great to them [on your resume ](https://enhancv.com/blog/volunteering-on-resume/)or in the cover letter you ([definitely should](https://enhancv.com/blog/are-cover-letters-necessary/)) send them when you **do** apply. Another great option is to stay in the general or a related type of organization. But when it comes down to it, all volunteering experience is going to help. Remember again, a non-profit is hiring _the right people_, not necessarily just the right skills. And for their business model, the right person is someone who’s interested in giving back, even when it’s not exactly what they’re interested in or want to do. Because volunteering is such a key part of getting work at a nonprofit, be sure you highlight it on your resume. Check out Enhancv’s top [volunteer resume examples](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/volunteer/) to see examples of great resumes that use volunteer experience effectively to get some ideas for yours. 2: Follow your heart, not your wallet Before you start applying to jobs at a nonprofit, identify where you want to direct your energy. Make sure you know what you’re passionate about, what drives you to do certain kinds of work, and what you’d like to achieve. Like we said, money is not going to be something you can rely on to motivate you at a non-profit. So do your homework in advance to find the things that WILL, and look for work that offers them. When it comes time to interview at a nonprofit, the best candidate will be the person who’s there for the right reasons. Because they operate differently from other workplaces and have unique stresses, the most compelling candidates are people who are passionate about the cause or mission, not necessarily the ones with the most experience. But don’t misunderstand, it’s not that just anyone off the street can get work with a nonprofit if they’re excited about the cause. You’ll still want to work on getting the right credentials, experience, and connections to make it all come together! 3. Do your homework Stay current on the issues and trends impacting the cause you’re interested in, and make yourself aware of the different organizations in your area looking at it. This legwork will pay dividends once you’re [tailoring your cover letters](https://enhancv.com/blog/what-is-a-cover-letter/) for specific nonprofit jobs and [during the interview](https://enhancv.com/blog/tag/interview-tips/) process. 4. Network I don’t think we can say this enough, non-profits operate on a different model than private industry companies. They hire the people that will be the best fit based on their personal characteristics mostly, not on their experience. So if you know someone personally or that’s a friend-of-a-friend, and they’ll recommend you or write a[ reference letter ](https://enhancv.com/blog/everything-about-reference-letters-writing-or-requesting/)for a job they know is available, ask them to. You’re going to have a way better chance of getting that job than anyone applying for it off the street will because you’ll be the right _kind_ of person for it - easy as that. Exercise all your options with this, every connection you can make may help. Think back about people you’ve worked with, but also people you met through school, and for sure scan your social media contacts to see who’s involved in any way with the cause or organization you’re interested in. 5. Your Education There are so many opportunities at nonprofits that it’s impossible to say exactly what to go to school for. But we CAN say they’ll be impressed by many of the same educational achievements that for-profit employers would for similar positions. If you’re looking to step into a specialized or technical role with a non-profit, it’s important that you show them you have the [necessary certifications or credentials](https://enhancv.com/blog/certifications-on-resume/). A college degree is going to be necessary for many positions, while experience may be another requirement. I know we just did finish saying that nonprofits hire for the _person_, but here’s the thing: That person also needs to be able to do the job. Getting in at the bottom rung of a nonprofit may just require heart, and sure you can work your way into higher responsibilities more easily at a nonprofit, but some roles simply will require formal education or accreditation. Having said that, remember that nonprofits are also often going to lean on their workers to do work outside what they’d traditionally be asked to do at other jobs (that funding thing again). So learning broadly and outside the specific role you have is also going to be seen as a benefit, since it shows you’re versatile and could be a great asset to the team. 6. Look for internships This is a great option for anyone in school or who just finished. An internship is usually a position students [apply for](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-write-cover-letter-for-internship/) as part of their program or may be offered altogether separately by the organization. Internships are often temporary (to start), and may be paid or unpaid, opportunities for both the organization and the worker they hire to get familiar with one another. The nonprofit gets free or low-paid work, and most importantly, you get a valuable learning experience that’s convenient with your school schedule. Oftentimes, if you do well, internships lead to a job, almost like an extended working interview. So finding one in the area you want to work or with the specific nonprofit you’d like could be a huge win for your career goals. But just like with volunteering, even if it doesn’t work out with that non-profit, internships can [look great on your resume](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-list-an-internship-on-your-resume/). They’re evidence you’ve done some of the technical work, but also show you’ve likely built a lot of the [soft skills](https://enhancv.com/blog/soft-skills-on-resume/) real work experience helps develop. Finding work with a non-profit can be a personally rewarding experience, and it can offer huge professional and career benefits. Those benefits may come at the cost of some earnings, and nonprofits can be mentally and emotionally taxing, but the payoff is huge. If you think a nonprofit may be for you, don’t wait to start putting our tips into practice. But if you’re ready to start sending out resumes, or already have an interview at one, check out our other guides to get you ready for success. We’ve also helped 1000+ people just like you find [success](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/) in the hiring process through our [career counseling service](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/). Whether you need help on the job[ search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/) stage, [prepping for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), or while you’re trying to[ negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of the job or compensation, we’ve got experts that are ready to give you advice and help you strategize your next move. Takeaways * Nonprofits are organizations that focus on helping their community or that bring awareness to a cause. * They operate a bit differently from standard companies or organizations because of their non-profit focus - think ‘from the heart’ more than ‘bells and whistles’. * You can volunteer at a non-profit to start, or look for paid work right off the bat. * Your personal interest and passions will play a huge part in whether you succeed at a non-profit, so do some initial groundwork to determine what you really want. * Non-profits offer amazing personal satisfaction and the potential for great professional advancement. * They also often have lower than market rate wages, and the nature of their focus can lead to burnout. * Looking at your network, broadening your education, and taking advantage of internships are great ways to maximize your chances of getting work at a nonprofit.

Kevin Roy
Nov 19, 2022 10 min read
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Career Growth
Top 5 Most Common Job Scams in 2023 and how to Spot Them

Were you emailed to apply for a job that seems too good to be true? Chances are…. you’re right, it probably is. Internet job scams are widespread and getting more sophisticated. [Security experts are warning](https://www.ic3.gov/Media/Y2022/PSA220201) everyone can be a target and to be on guard. But, scammers are nothing new, either, and the way to deal with them hasn’t changed. Awareness of the problem and of some of the tricks they use can help you avoid wasting time on them, along with any losses or issues that could come up from them. If you want to learn whether the work-from-home dream job you came across is legit or a scam, read on. We’ve written this article to answer all the questions you have about job scams (and how to avoid them) and to answer a few you probably haven’t thought of yet. **In this article, we’ll cover:** * The 5 most common types of job scams in 2023 * The 6 most common work-from-home scams * 10 warning signs you’re looking at a job scam Once you’ve read this article, you’ll be a great place to judge whether the job you’re interested in is legit. If you find it is, we’ve got great articles on what you should[ include in your resume](https://enhancv.com/blog/good-characteristics-to-put-resume/), how to [format your resume](https://enhancv.com/blog/cover-letter-tips/), and essential [interview tips](https://enhancv.com/blog/tag/interview-tips/) to help you land it. Want a bit more help or want it for something specific? Check out our [career counseling](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/) service. We’ve helped thousands of people along the way succeed in their [job search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/), [prep for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), [negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of their contracts, and otherwise [hit their career targets](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/). The 5 Most Common Job Scams in 2023 There have been fraudsters way longer than we’ve had the internet. Internet job scams are just the latest version of something that’s been happening for decades, whether by word of mouth, newspaper, or other advertisement. Because the internet is so widespread and easily reaches so many people, the amount of fraud on it is huge - and it’s growing. The [US Government](https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/news/press-releases/2022/02/new-data-shows-ftc-received-28-million-fraud-reports-consumers-2021-0) says there were 2.8 million fraud reports in 2021, and losses increased 70% over the year to over $5.8 billion USD. Whatever the scam, there are two things fraudsters are usually looking for: * Your money * Your personal info (...to get your money) Maybe that’s one thing? Anyhow, the short story is they want to take your money, and they’re not offering you a job. So we’ve put together a list of the most common types of job scams to help you identify and avoid them. #1. Emailed Fake Job Offers These are everywhere. I get one of these at least once a week… Usually the email is coming from a ‘recruiter’, Company X’s ‘HR’, or some other person who would IRL be looking for and hiring candidates. They typically claim to have found your resume online somewhere and that they think you’re the perfect fit for a job they have opened. All kinds of jobs are being offered this way, so it’s hard to narrow it down, and in fact, sometimes recruiters really do reach out like that. But you’ll know for sure it’s a scam if you get a posting like this, and you’re asked to provide personal info, especially your: * Social Security Number * Driver’s license * Bank account information Any of these items is going to give the scammer extra info about you, they can leverage to break into other accounts you have or to steal or compromise your identity in some way. #2. Fake Jobs on Social Media Given how popular social media is, it should be a consideration in your job search plans. But, the popularity of platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn has made them hotspots for scammers looking to take advantage of you. Most often, like with the email scams, a ‘recruiter’ or ‘HR department’ will message about or send you a link to a webpage advertising a job that sounds amazing. The scammer might use an intro like the email scam, saying you seem like a perfect fit, or it could just be a blanket message phishing for interest. But, while recruiters may reach out for top talent, respectable companies wait for entry level workers to apply to them. Be wary that a job is probably a scam if someone is reaching out to you through social media about an entry level job that seems to good to be true. #3. Job Scams on Popular and Verified Job Sites Reputable job search sites do a good job of posting the legit jobs you’re looking for. But because people flock to them, and often let their guard down because they’re ‘verified’, scammers are looking for you there too. Even [the best job search sites](https://enhancv.com/blog/job-search-sites/) like Indeed, Monster, or Career Builder can’t keep out all the fake job ads. Sites like Craigslist are even more notorious for them. Some of these job sites are aggregators - they collect listings from around the web automatically - while others rely on companies to post jobs themselves, and often they do both. Either way, even though the jobs listed may have been verified, like we explain below in the 6 Most Common Work-From-Home Scams, some of the scam jobs exist, but they never pay you or pay you less than the fees you send in. So, even though the job may seem legit and has been verified, keep your guard up and remember not to send any money or information in advance. #4. Job Placement Service Scams This is a pretty common job scam, but you don’t see it as often as the other ones we’ve mentioned - probably because it’s so easy to spot as a scam. This one has scammers impersonating a recruiter, job placement services, or a staffing agency, and offering to find you work - guaranteed. The thing is, those job placement services are almost always paid for by companies looking for work, or in some cases they may be government funded, and certainly you can approach and hire them. But you’ll never find them cold-calling the talent and looking to get paid. So, if someone reaches out trying to connect you with a killer position, but is asking you to pay them a finders fee or something similar, you can bet that it’s a scam, and they’re just after your money (or maybe your identity too!). #5. Work-From-Home Job Scams Making money from home is a lot of people’s dream job, and that fact hasn’t been lost on scammers. Probably the most common job scam is placing ads on online job sites (think, Indeed, Monster, Craigslist, or your local online classifieds website). That said, scammers are also reaching out by text, email, or to personal social media pages with job offers promising great pay for work you can do from home. One way or another, these types of scams are all set up to take your money, whether by making you pay sign-up fees or other up-front costs for training, specific certifications, or other gimmicks. The 6 most common work-from-home job scams you’ll come across are: 1. Envelope stuffing: where you pay a sign-up fee to do this simple job from home 2. Product assembly: basically, you buy the materials from a company to make products for them, but they always find problems with the, and don’t pay you. 3. Data entry scams: while plenty of legit data entry jobs exist, these make you pay upfront registration or training fees 4. Reselling merchandise: for which you have to buy products from the company in advance and are then left to recoup your money - if you can 5. Rebate processing: a job that promises high income for processing rebates from home for a non-refundable training fee, but actually involves placing ads online and getting a small commission every time a product gets sold. 6. Reshipping: which consists of receiving, repackaging, and reshipping products at home, but you never get a paycheck in return! Keeping these jobs scams in mind while you’re on your job search will go a long way in keeping the scammers away. Or maybe you read this and realized the job you weren’t sure about is a great opportunity! Amazing! If you need help [writing a great resume](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-write-a-resume/), want to know [all about cover letters](https://enhancv.com/blog/what-is-a-cover-letter/), or even [what to wear to an interview](https://enhancv.com/blog/what-to-wear-to-job-interview/), we’ve got you covered. Top 10+ Warning Signs it’s a Job Scam We’ve covered the 5 most common ways a scammer will try to reach you, and the 6 most common work-from-home job scams. But, these guys are always cranking out new schemes, so you have to keep alert. Here are the top 10+ warning signs you should look out for that might tip you off you’re looking at a job scam. If you notice any of these, even if it’s tempting to respond, take a minute to look a little closer at the company, or just leave the post alone. 1. The pay is great, but literally anybody could do the job 2. The job posting you found on a job board is not on the company’s website 3. The email or job ad is full of errors 4. The job description and requirements are too vague or don’t make sense 5. You’re directed to a non-standard company website, like www.USAmazon.com instead of www.amazon.com 6. They’re contacting you through non-company/organization email domains or apps. For example, an actual Amazon recruiter would contact you using a company email like j.rizzo@amazon.com, not j.rizzoAMazon1223@surfmail.com) 7. You need to purchase any kind of start-up equipment from the company in advance 8. They expect you to pay a non-refundable registration fee 9. You’re asked to provide your bank account information (before you’ve actually been hired) 10. You receive a contract asking for personal identifiable information such as your SSN/SIN or bank details before interviewing or any face-to-face time 11. The potential employer is in a rush to hire you on and have you send them information or money Finding the right job is a process, and sometimes it’s hard. We’ve got articles with [resume advice](https://enhancv.com/blog/tag/resume-advice/), [cover letter help](https://enhancv.com/blog/tag/cover-letter-help/), and [interview tips](https://enhancv.com/blog/tag/interview-tips/) that can make it much easier for you. Want more info on something specific? Check out our [career counseling](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/) service. We’ve helped thousands of people along the way succeed in their [job search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/), [prep for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), [negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of their contracts, and otherwise [hit their career targets](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/). Takeaways * Job scams are rampant out there, and they’re on the increase * Even the most trusted social media and job search pages can have scams on them * Job scammers are usually going to be asking you for info or money in advance * If the job seems too good to be true, it probably is * Look for obvious spelling and grammar mistakes in recruiter emails or job descriptions * Scammers don’t usually have access to official email or websites, look for unusual ones * Most companies aren’t out headhunting for entry-level positions with great pay * Don’t send anyone money in advance, and don’t send them any personal identification information before you’re sure they’re legit, and you have the job.

Kevin Roy
Nov 18, 2022 9 min read
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Career Growth
The 19 Best Jobs for Teens

Saving up to go to school? Or maybe you’re tired of asking your parents for money to go out? Whatever the reason, you’re here because you’re thinking it’s time to get your first job. That’s great, and we’re here to help get you moving in the right direction! We’ve put together a list specifically for teens of 19 great jobs across 4 industries that you can use to start your job search. Some are entry-level jobs, and others could be second steps or will let you move onto higher-paying roles with more responsibilities. We’re also including info on what you’ll be expected to do in the role, what you can expect to get paid, we’ve included links to some great resume examples you can look at, and we even threw in a bonus resume quick-guide. Our resume examples are great tools when you’re starting out looking for work because they’re tried and tested samples of people who got hired! Starting out working as a teenager can be pretty tough because you’ve got little or no experience, limited references, and your network probably isn’t developed yet. If you’re just starting out looking for work, aren’t too sure of what steps to take, and want some expert advice that will fast-track you to a great job, check out our [career-counselling](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/) service. We’ve helped thousands of people succeed in their [job search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/), [prep for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), [negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of their contracts, and otherwise [hit their job search targets](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/). Get in touch with us if you’re just starting out, or if you're curious about any ways you can better secure the kind of work you’re looking for. The 19 Best Jobs for Teens First things first: there are a couple of formalities you’re going to want to look into. Depending on where you live, there may be age restrictions for some kind of work, and it’s almost certain you’re going to have to get some paperwork sorted before you’ll be able to work legally. If you're over 17, most doors are going to be open to you, but even then, some states or provinces won’t let you serve alcohol for another year or two. If you’re under 17, it's smart to check what the labor laws are in your area before you decide which industries and jobs to look at. If you want to go it alone, you can Google local government websites to get the info you need on the laws where you live. But if you want to reach out to someone, there are tons of free municipal, county, and state/provincial agencies almost everywhere that can help you with this step if you give them a call. If you’ve got all that covered, or just want to take a look anyhow, read on for our list of the 19 best jobs for teens. We’ve broken it down into 4 industries for you, so feel free to skip to the one of your choice. Food service The food service industry covers everything from concessions to coffee shops, fast food joints, and restaurants, with work that ranges from dishwashing to head waiter or manager. These are great jobs that offer a ton of flexibility and room to grow, and you can start most with little or no experience at all. **Barista** Here's a great [barista](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/barista/) resume. Average US wage: $15.85/hour (+ tips) A barista preps and serves coffee and espresso-based drinks to customers in cafés. You’d be expected to greet customers, answer any questions they might have about the menu, and take and make their orders, all with great customer service and in a timely way. Some other expectations likely will include keeping your work area clean and tidy, looking after the customer areas, and you might have opening and closing duties. That said, baristas also sometimes make tips, which makes doing the extra duties worth the extra effort. **Concession Stand Worker** Here's a great [concession Stand Worker](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/fast-food/) resume. Average US wage: $16.60/hr Working at a concession stand means you’ll operate and handle the different service tools and machines to serve customers at movie cinemas, theaters, stadiums, festivals, fairs, and other public venues. Typical duties include selling snacks and drinks to customers, handling cash or card payments, stocking the stand, and keeping a tidy work area. **Fast Food Worker** Here's a great [fast Food Worker](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/mcdonalds/) resume. Average US wage: $16.50/hr As a fast food worker, you’ll be serving people food who are often in a rush, so you’ll need to keep on your toes. You might work in the kitchen preparing the food, or you may be at the counter taking orders, answering questions, ringing people through, and always smiling! As part of your shift, you’ll also be expected to stock the food and service items you use, and clean your workstation, service area, and customer seating area. The great thing about this job though is entry positions aren’t going to require experience a lot of the time, and they’re a great way to build your resume. **Restaurant server** Here's a great [restaurant server](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/server/) resume. Average US wage: $15.47/hr (+ tips) A restaurant server delivers food and drinks to the customers in a restaurant. This is a fast-paced role that requires great customer service skills, and depending on the restaurant, may require more or less experience and product knowledge. The expectations for this job depend on the restaurant, but you can assume that stocking and some cleaning will be part of your job. These jobs are often super flexible, though, and the tips you get can really add up as you gain experience. **Restaurant busser** Here's a [restaurant busser](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/busser/) resume. Average US wage:$15.73/hr (+ tip out) Bussers are support staff for the servers at restaurants. They’re often expected to make sure tables are cleared of dirty dishes and cutlery, help keep the dining room tidy, may run food for the servers, and generally act as aides. While this isn’t the most glamorous job, bussing tables is one of the most entry-level positions in a restaurant, and very rarely requires past work experience – which makes it an ideal job for teenagers. It’s also a great way to learn the ropes and move up to a serving position. **Dishwasher** Here's a great [dishwasher](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/dishwasher/) resume. Average US wage: $13.96/hr Restaurants often fill this role with teens who have little to no other experience, which is great news if you’re just starting out. It’s an important role in a kitchen, but one you probably learned a bit about just doing the chores around your house. You’ll be expected to wash dishes, help keep the kitchen clean, and as you gain experience most kitchens will put you to work doing prep work in your downtime. That’s where the opportunity lies - as you gain prep experience, you can start moving up into the cooking roles with more responsibility and higher wages. Retail If you like talking to people and have strong customer service skills, retail might be the right opportunity for you. Retail often offers flexible hours that help you balance life, school, and work, and sales retail jobs can offer competitive pay with opportunities to move up in the industry. **Retail sales associate** Here's a [Retail sales associate](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/part-time-sales-associate/) resume. Average US wage: $16.53 per hour (+ commission in some stores) The main role of a retail sales associate is to help customers find and buy what they’re looking for at a retail store. Other duties include keeping the store tidy, arranging products in an eye-catching way, and maybe even keeping an eye on customers to ensure there’s no theft or damage. If you’re personable, you can probably get an entry-level retail job with little or no experience. This job has tons of room for advancement though, with the options of going to higher-end stores where commissions can be lucrative, or following the steps to move into supervisor and management roles. **Supermarket cashier or bagger** Here's a great [Supermarket cashier or bagger](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/cashier/) resume. Average US wage: Local minimum wage, higher with experience. If you're looking for a first job, consider either of these roles. There’s a solid chance a supermarket in your area is hiring for one of them, neither require you have much nor even any experience, and they’re often staffed by teenagers. If you’re under 16 or aren’t super confident handling money or doing math, then bagging may be your best bet. But if you feel confident to work the cash register and have a little customer service skill, try for cashier, since you’ll make a bit more money. **Personal shopper** Average US wage: Roughly $20/hr, but each gig is different and it depends on your hustle. This is a pretty recent job made popular over the pandemic. It requires no prior experience and typically is done freelance, so it’s ideal to fit into a school schedule. As a personal shopper, you’ll be collecting and possibly delivering items customers place orders for through apps like Instacart. Delivering will require you have a car, so this job is best for teens 16+. Support Services/Caregiving A support service or caregiving job is a fantastic option if you like to help or take care of other people, and directly impact them positively. The responsibilities you’ll have will be a bit higher than some of the other jobs we mentioned, but the personal satisfaction can be outsized, too. **Tutor** Here's a great [tutor](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/tutor/) resume Average US wage: $15-35a Tutors help individual or small groups of students with school work, languages, or other specific skills they want to improve. Mostly this job takes the form of helping students understand new concepts or with practice work in the subject being tutored. This job requires that you know the subject you’re helping with, have patience, and good interpersonal and planning skills are key. You can usually do this on your own schedule and make it work around your other responsibilities. **Dog walker** Average US wage: $21.74/hr If you love dogs and think you’ve got the chops to handle more than one at a time, being a dog walker might be a perfect fit for you. Dog walking doesn't require any previous work experience and the hours can be pretty flexible, depending on your clients. You might find work doing this through an existing agency, or you can put add in the local socials to find your own clients. As you build up experience and a reputation, not only will word of mouth get you more clients, but you’ll be able to start increasing your rate. **Pet sitter** Average US wage: $16.09/hr A pet sitter looks after other peoples’ pets, usually dogs and cats, while their owners are away. You’ll be expected to either give them space in your own home or go to the client's house to give the pet its food and water, groom it, and give any medications if required. Of course, you probably don’t have your own home, so you may need to clear it with your parents, or if you get work with an agency they may have space or will send you to the client’s own residence. Previous experience with pets is going to be key here, but no formal work experience is going to be needed to get your foot in the door. **Camp counsellor** Here's a great [camp counsellor](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/camp-counselor/) resume. Average US wage: $15.24/hr A camp counselor watches over the ‘campers’, teaches them skills, engages kids in activities, and keeps everyone getting along and safe while they’re on the job. This was traditionally a summer job, but more and more often in urban areas, there are camps for specialized activities run all year long, for things like basketball, church, or even computer programming! Other duties might include communicating with parents and providing updates to camp organizers whenever required. Bear in mind also that this is likely a set schedule, and you’re probably going to need some personal references confirming that you’re responsible in general and knowledgeable in the activities you’ll be supervising. **Babysitter** Here's a great [babysitter](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/babysitter/) resume. Average US wage: $21.25 Babysitting is one of the most common jobs to get as a teenager because there’s no legal age requirement, it often grows organically through neighbors and family friends, you can set your own rate, and it fits well into a busy schedule. You don’t need any formal training for this, and if you have younger siblings, you probably know the ropes already. If you feel comfortable looking after young children, there’s a good you can ask some of the adults you or your parents know about starting this right away. You won't get an official work reference out of this, but you can definitely get personal references to help you when you’re looking for your next job. **Lifeguard** Here's a great [lifeguard](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/lifeguard/) resume. Average US wage: $14.05/hr This job has one obvious requirement, being a strong swimmer, but other than certification for that and often an age restriction, little or no other work experience is going to be asked for when you apply. This is also an amazing job to be able to put on your resume because the trust and responsibility that goes along with this job are going to make you shine to any future employers. General/Manual Labor A general or manual labor job describes most non-skilled, hands-on tasks, such as cleaning, moving or landscaping. You could find yourself in almost any work environment, so it’s hard to narrow down a general laborer’s job responsibilities. One of the great things about these jobs is that many of the skills you learn at one job will be transferable to others. And since there’s a lot of opportunity to move up from general labour positions, especially to less hands-on work, these are great jobs to start with and build on. **Lawn Care/Landscaping** Average US wage: $14- $28hr, depending on experience. Landscaping is a great job for anyone who’s creative and loves to be outside. Your duties will vary from company to company, but usually include mowing lawns, raking leaves, trimming hedges, and other tasks to manicure and maintain a yard. If you’re just starting out, you won’t be expected to have any special skills or tools, but you will *definitely* be expected to have a good work ethic and be willing to put your back into it all day. This isn’t a job to take if you want to sit back and relax, it’ll be hard work, but putting in the effort will move you up the ladder, and it’s great experience for your resume. **Mover** Average US wage: $15.96/hr Movers help individuals or businesses when it's time to, well…move! You’re expected to do the heavy lifting, but at the same time, you have to be very respectful of the clients and their property. You won't need any training or experience for this job, but this may be the most physical job on this list, so be prepared to work hard. And remember, you might be dealing with people’s heirlooms in their personal spaces when they’re already stressed out, so you’ll need to flex all your customer service skills in this role. **Delivery driver** Here's a great [delivery driver](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/delivery-driver/) resume. Average US wage: $10-20.50/hr, depending on experience and hustle If you’re old enough to have a driver’s license in your area, you probably have all the credentials you’ll need to find work as a delivery driver. Entry-level applicants are a great fit for this job since there’s almost no interaction other than at the points of pickup and drop off, and you’ll only be trusted with the jobs you prove yourself able to do. If you’re willing to hustle and treat the items and people you’re working with the respect they deserve, you’ll move up and get higher-paying jobs in return. On top of that, driving is a great way to gain valuable experience and show future employers that you’re responsible and work well under pressure. **House cleaner** Here's a [house cleaner](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/housekeeper/). Average US wage: $15.37/hr House cleaners are expected to clean and tidy houses and apartments according to the expectations of their clients. It will vary, but in general, you’ll sweep or vacuum rooms, wash the dishes, mop floors, take out the trash, clean bathrooms, dust, and disinfect surfaces. A great hack for this job is to work as an assistant to a professional house cleaner and help them with their tasks. They’ll get all the clients and supplies you’ll need while you’re figuring the job out. Work-life Balance Once you score the best job for a teenager there is, it can be easy to get carried away with the fun of a new work environment and get used to the money you start making. At that point, it’s also easy to lose perspective and lose track of your priorities - plenty of people with more experience than you have. To keep from going overboard, bear in mind the following ways you can maintain a healthy work-life balance as a teenager: * Practice your time management skills and plan your day * Prioritize your activities and expect workplace changes * Maintain a healthy lifestyle by eating healthily and sleeping well * Get support from career coaches, mentors, friends, and family members whenever required * Keep your personal and professional reasons for getting a job in mind Writing Your Resume We have some great articles focused on different aspects of [writing a resume](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-write-a-resume/), and we have amazing examples of [resumes specifically for teens](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/teens/). But let's hit a few of the key tips and most frequently asked questions we get from teens to get things flowing without going into too much detail. Highlight relevant skills Make sure you tailor your resume to fit your skills and accomplishments to the specific job you’re applying to. For example, if you’re applying for a job as a camp counselor, highlight any experience you have working with kids or leading groups, even if it was something like the [Boy Scouts](https://enhancv.com/blog/eagle-scout-on-resume/). If you’re applying to be a waiter, emphasize experience in customer service, or working/playing on a team. Highlight Academic Achievement It’s a safe bet that a lot of your achievements to date are from the classroom. Emphasize things like a high[ GPA](https://enhancv.com/blog/gpa-on-resume/) or any academic [awards](https://enhancv.com/blog/resume-awards/) you’ve gotten because they show that you’re motivated and a hard worker. Let Your Character Shine Include anything that shows your positive character. If you are part of any clubs, student council, have volunteered helping people, or anything else that shows you’re a good person and work well on teams, let them know, people want to hire people that are likeable! Be Positive Express your enthusiasm for employment and be as positive as you can. Nobody wants to hire someone that doesn’t want to be there or is going to bring the team down. You need to show an employer that you’re going to ADD something to the team, not drain them. [Use a Resume Builder](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/teens/) If this is your first time writing a resume, or even if you’ve only done it a few times, chances are you’re missing or overlooking something that could take your resume from good to great, Use our [resume builder](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/teens/) designed specifically for teens and high-school students. There are tips and tricks, sample resumes, and you can customize it exactly for you and the job you’re applying to. Takeaways * Even with no experience, there’s no shortage of opportunities out here for you * Every job you get early on will help get your next job, so don’t pass up opportunities because they’re not the perfect fit today * Look to the surrounding adults, neighbors, and family friends to see if there are any opportunities right there for you to start working * Don’t get hung up on the role you start with, entry-level positions are just that and with a bit of dedication you’ll move onto something more glamorous * The first jobs you get won’t have the highest pay either, but the more experience you get, the more you’ll earn, so start early and keep at it Looking for ways to make money as a teen? We’ve helped 1000s of people find [success](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/) in the hiring process through our [career-counseling service](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/). Whether you need help writing a resume, on the [job search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/) stage, or [prepping for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), we’ve got experts that are ready to give you advice and help you strategize your next move.

Kevin Roy
Nov 18, 2022 16 min read
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Career Growth
Expert Advice on the Best Jobs for Introverts - 20 Careers to Find Success In

Do you enjoy spending time alone and sometimes need time to recharge after being around other people? If so, chances are you’re an introvert. Congrats, we’ve written this article just for you! Maybe the most important part of navigating your career path is finding work that vibes with who you are. [Research shows ](https://www.forbes.com/sites/bryanrobinson/2020/12/05/scientists-discover-the-link-between-your-personality-and-degree-of-career-success/?sh=53565b987c4cs) that your personality has important effects on early career outcomes. Therefore, success does not depend on your extroversion, but on your ability to put your skills, experiences, and personality to work in your favor.)that matching your work to your personality can have huge effects on your career outcomes, so you want to get this working in your favor. If you’re an introvert (or _think_ you are) read on, because there are some specific considerations and jobs that are going to be best for your personality type, and we’re going to cover them all. As an introvert, the upshot is you’re going to do your best in a work environment where you get to be on your own a lot of the time and that limits social interactions. Thankfully, even though you’ll want to [choose your employer](https://enhancv.com/blog/choose-your-employer/) carefully, there’s no shortage of jobs that fit this bill where you can excel. So if you’re an introvert, knowing the jobs that best match your personality is the first step to starting the career that suits you best. Keep reading to learn about some of your options. **In this article, we cover:** * What is an introvert? * 21 of the best jobs for introverts * Some basic info on what these jobs entail * Plus: what salary you can expect to earn at each of these jobs! Matching your personality to your career is an often overlooked step in reaching your career goals. If you want to look into this aspect of your career plan or want to learn about other steps you may be overlooking, check out our [career counseling](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/) service. We’ve helped thousands of people along the way succeed in their [job search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/), [prep for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), [negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of their contracts, and otherwise [hit their career targets](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/). Get in touch with us If you want to do a deep dive on informational interviews, or if you're curious about other ways to better navigate your career path. What Is an Introvert? You may have come across the terms introversion and extroversion, and often we’re actually a combination of both. But we’re focusing on more introverted people who tend to be more reserved, would rather less stimulating environments, and they need time alone to recharge. While not all introverts will fit a single standard definition, some of the characteristics introverts share include: * Being quiet and reserved * Are often independent and like spending time alone * Can be introspective and self-aware * Often feel fatigued from social interactions * Smaller group of friends * May experience shyness and social anxiety When you’re looking for jobs as an introvert, it’s important to find something that energizes you in the ways you need, rather than draining you. While some introverts may like jobs that require a lot of social interaction, like a retail or serving job, they’re often too taxing. Identifying [what motivates you](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-answer-what-motivates-you-interview-question/) for work is an important step in finding your success. Decide how much interaction you can have and look at your interests, and compare them to the ideas we’ve listed below. Best Jobs for Introverts So let’s assume if you’re still reading this that you ARE an introvert - congrats, your personality traits set you up perfectly for some amazing work opportunities! You may be kind of a quiet person, but your ambition is just as high as anyone else’s, and you deserve job satisfaction, so read on. We scoured the internet and reached out across our network to find the best jobs for introverts, what you need to work in the industry, and the salary you can expect to make at these jobs. Remember too, although the info on licensing and salaries we’re giving is geared toward the US market, the general info applies everywhere. 1. [Graphic Designer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/designer/) This is any techie and creative introvert’s dream job! Graphic designers create visuals that communicate ideas using a variety of digital tools for anything from designing logos or creating apps. One favorite thing about this job is that much of the work is freelance, and you can do it from home, so it can be a really flexible, satisfying, as well as lucrative job for an introvert. Average Salary: $40,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s degree or specialized college program Adobe Creative Suite courses (recommended) Industry experience 2. [Social Media Manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/social-media-manager/) You should consider working as a social media manager if you prefer to stay out of the limelight, but still enjoy creating content for Instagram, Tik Tok, and other social media. They develop and implement social media posts and marketing campaigns for clients, maximize the effectiveness of those campaigns based on the analytics, and engage with followers and customers. Average Salary: $41,500 Requirements: Social media experience College-level marketing certification or Bachelor’s degree (recommended) Industry internship or volunteer experience 3. [Mechanic](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/mechanic/) If you like spending time on your own, solving problems and working with your hands, a job as a mechanic may be the perfect fit for you. Most of the work requires little to no social interaction since so much of the work takes place focused just on the vehicles. Average Salary: $45,500 Requirements: Complete an automotive education program Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification (recommended) 4. [Librarian](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/librarian/) Becoming a librarian may be what you’re looking for if you enjoy spending your working hours in the blissful silence of a library. Librarians have some social interactions since they help visitors find and check out books, but they’re more peaceful interactions than at say a retail store, and the work also includes cataloging and shelving materials and helping with internal paperwork. Average Salary: $48,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s degree (minimum) Master’s degree (recommended) Teaching credential (for some school librarians) 5. Archivist Archivists mostly work at universities, libraries, and research institutions overseeing and maintaining collections of historical items and artwork. This is a great opportunity for anyone who’s especially introverted as you work mostly on your own in very quiet settings. Average Salary: $49,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s degree Master’s degree Industry experience 6. [Landscape Designer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/landscaping/) This is the job for you if you love being outdoors, have a flair for the creative and can transfer that onto the screen or page. Landscape designers develop plans for private or public outdoor spaces, including yards, parks, golf courses, and other spaces people enjoy spending time outside. Average Salary: $50,500 Requirements: Specialized College certification Industry experience 7. [Writer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/writer/) Some introverts find it far easier to get their thoughts across in writing rather than verbally, in which case, working as a writer is a natural choice. If you have a knack for writing, there’s a huge range of jobs available, from content writing, copywriting, technical writing, to creative writing, any of which can be done solo right from your home. Average Salary: $51,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s degree (recommended) Industry experience 8. [Chef](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/cook/) Introverts with a love of cooking and who love satisfying other people with the delicious food they prepare may want to look into becoming a chef. Chefs manage the kitchens they work in, create menus, and train staff, but they have a lot of flexibility to set time alone in the office and kitchen working on their own. Average Salary: $55,000 Requirements: Culinary school (recommended) Industry experience 9. [Editor](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/freelance-editor/) Introverts with a passion for the written word should also consider working as an editor. They work alone most of the time, reading and revising a variety of content for different industries, fields, and media. A lot of the work can be done from home, and this job often allows the flexibility of freelancing so you can work at your own pace. Average Salary: $57,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s or Master’s degree Industry experience 10. [Digital Marketer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/digital-marketing/) Digital marketers use technology to promote content, reach customers, and increase brand awareness, and it’s another job an introvert can do from the comfort of home. This may be the job you’re looking for if you love problem-solving and have great ideas for marketing products and services. Average Salary: $57,000 Requirements: Specialized College certification or Bachelor’s degree Digital marketing course (recommended) Google Analytics certification (recommended) Industry experience 11. [Research Scientist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/scientist/) If your interest in school had you in the lab as often as possible, think about becoming a research scientist. Research scientists perform trials and experiments, and may find work in labs for the government, environmental organizations, educational institutions, and private industry. Average Salary: $66,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s degree Master’s degree Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) certification (recommended) Industry experience 12. [Accountant](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/accounting/) If the option to work with numbers in almost any industry you can imagine sounds like your vibe, you may want to look into becoming an accountant. Accountants prepare and examine financial records and analyze any opportunities or risks, and this is a field that is growing as the paperwork people and companies need to complete gets larger and more complex. You interact with your clients from time to time, but generally, this is alone time in front of paperwork and a screen. Average Salary: $66,500 Requirements: Bachelor’s degree Certified Public Accountant license 13. [Software Test Engineer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/software-tester/) This is another great option for introverts with an interest in tech. Software test engineers recommend software improvements after developing and implementing testing methods on those programs. There’re a ton of avenues and opportunities available once you get into this industry, whether in the office or at home, and in all kinds of industries. Average Salary: $70,500 Requirements: Bachelor’s degree ISTQB Foundation Level Certification (recommended) Industry experience 14. [Architect](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/architect/) Architects spend a lot of their time working independently to plan and design a range of structures from residential homes to office or commercial buildings and other structures. Creatives who can problem-solve are going to excel in this job that will mostly be hands-off, but involves a bit of time client-facing and job sites. Average Salary: $76,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s degree Master’s degree (recommended) Paid internship (three years, generally) State license 15. [Application Developer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/mobile-application-developer/) This job has been hot for a while, and it’s a perfect fit for introverts who are creative and have a strong tech interest. You’ll spend your days working mostly alone designing, creating, and updating programs and apps for any number of possible devices and uses. You can work in almost any field and for all kinds of companies, as a full-time employee or freelance, and often you can do this work remotely. Average Salary: $79,000 Requirements: Specialist College certification, Bachelor’s, or Master’s degree Google Developers Certification (recommended) Apple Developers Certification (recommended) Industry experience 16. [Therapist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/therapist/) This job will obviously involve talking to people regularly, but if you like helping people one-on-one, which some introverts do, becoming a therapist may be perfect for you. Introverted people are often empathic and have the patience to listen when they’re not in groups, which are ideal characteristics for a therapist. Other than time with clients, this is a very private profession you can do from home or a small office with little interaction otherwise. Average Salary: $82,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s degree Master’s degree (recommended) Specialized sector training Placement/Internship 17. [Information Technology Manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/it-manager/) Information technology managers spend a bit more time with people than some of the other jobs we’ve listed, but this is a great-paying and fast-growing field for someone with a passion for technology and problem-solving. This is for you if you’d like to be fixing software and hardware issues, setting up and installing upgrades, and working to ensure the digital security of a company's computer and other digital systems. Average Salary: $85,500 Requirements: Bachelor’s or Master’s degree IT management certifications (recommended) Industry experience 18. [Veterinarian](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/veterinary-technician/) Being a vet means you get to spend most of your time working very closely with animals instead of people, though you’ll likely have to interact with pet owners regularly too. If you can stick out the schooling and have a passion for animals, being a veterinarian is a great job that will keep you happy and fulfilled. Average Salary: $91,500 Requirements: Bachelor’s and Master’s degree Experience working with animals Doctorate/Certification from an accredited veterinary program North American Veterinary Licensing Examination State license 19. [Data Architect](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/data-architect/) As a data architect you’ll manage and design data systems, and research new means of data acquisition. If working with data and technology to solve new challenges everyday sounds rewarding to you, and you don’t want to face many social interactions or even want to work from home, being a data architect may be your ideal job. Average Salary: $115,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s or Master’s degree Specialized industry certifications Industry experience 20. Psychiatrist This is another job for introverts who like to spend time one-on-one with people. If you’re interested in how the mind works, mental health, and helping other people by diagnosing their disorders and prescribing medication, being a psychiatrist could be the right path for you. Average Salary: $190,000 Requirements: Bachelor’s and/or Master’s degree Medical school State license Certification from the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology Residency (four years) Takeaways * Don’t let your introversion hold you back * Find ways to leverage your introverted qualities in your favor * Focus on jobs where you can be independent and/or have limited social interactions * Opting for a remote job can be a great way to limit draining interactions * Freelance opportunities let you work independently and at your own pace, too We’ve helped 1000+ people just like you find [success](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/) in the hiring process through our [career counseling service](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/). Whether you need help on the job[ search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/) stage, [prepping for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), or while you’re trying to[ negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of the job or compensation, we’ve got experts that are ready to give you advice and help you strategize your next move.

Kevin Roy
Nov 18, 2022 11 min read
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Career Growth
Myers-Briggs Cheat Sheet: Expert Advice on the Best Careers Based on Personality

Have you ever wondered how some people sail through their careers, happy as can be, while you sometimes struggle for any motivation at all? The most common reason comes down to compatibility. Some people are better suited for some kinds of work than others. But this isn’t about how good we are at something, our education or our training! For the most part, it’s baked into our personalities. The great news, though, is that researchers have come up with some amazingly simple [tests and tools](https://hbr.org/2017/03/a-brief-history-of-personality-tests) we can use to identify our personality types and, by extension, which jobs are best for us (and the ones to stay away from!). The most common one is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test. Understanding your Myers-Briggs personality type can help identify the careers you'll excel at. Aspects of work that can be taken into account are going to include not just the type of work, but also the workplace environment that would best fit your personality. Considering your career path with a reference to your Myers-Briggs type can save you mountains of time and research. **In this article:** * We look at the characteristics of the 16 different Myers-Briggs personality types * Identify some of the best options for careers based on personality type * And as a bonus, we’ve included sample resumes for each of the career types we suggest! Taking a personality test to see how you’re suited to certain kinds of work and not others is a key step in choosing your career path. If you’ve never considered doing one, or want to learn about other steps you may be overlooking, check out our [career counseling](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/) service. We’ve helped thousands of people along the way succeed in their [job search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/), [prep for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), [negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of their contracts, and otherwise [hit their career targets](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/). Get in touch with us If you want to do a deep dive on informational interviews, or if you're curious about other ways to better navigate your career path. What is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Test? The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test is a questionnaire that is filled out that points toward different strengths and preferences that people have, how they see the world, and how they make decisions. Katharine Cook Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers, a mom and daughter duo, invented it over twenty years of research, drawing heavily on the work of psychiatrist Carl Jung. The MBTI suggests that people have preferred modes of perception (sensing or intuition) and judgment (thinking or feeling) as well as attitudes about how they build energy (extroversion or introversion) and their orientation to the outer world (judging or perceiving). These preferences combine to form 16 personality types. The 16 Myers-Briggs Personality Types (with Suggested Careers Based on Personality) Based on the answers given in the MBTI questionnaire, a person can be associated with one of 16 personality types. And for each of the types, certain careers have been identified as best fits. Here’s a short review of each personality type, with a few of the best possible career matches listed for each. As a bonus, each career we list is linked to a sample resume that would be great for looking for work in that role! 1. Inspector (ISTJ) This personality type usually presents as pretty serious and formal. They are recognised for their analytical and critical thought and are highly detail-oriented. Traditions are dear to them, and they value honor, hard work and social responsibility. Typically ISTJs are going to be reserved, quiet, calm and upright. Being responsible and reliable are two work qualities we can expect from this type also. In combination, these traits lead this personality to enjoy organized workplaces with clear rules laid out for them. ISTJ are great fits for roles as: * [Dentist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/dentist/) * [Certified public accountant](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/accounting/) * [Supply chain manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/supply-chain-manager/) * [Business analyst](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/business-analyst/) 2. Counselor (INFJ) INFJs are usually idealists with profound worldviews. Not happy to take things at surface level or accept things as they are, they are often looking for deeper meanings or answers. INFJs are known for their ideas and creative imagination. As for their preferred careers, peaceful work environments suit them best, and because they’re deep thinkers, they appreciate challenges at workThis personality type is definitely empathetic and caring, helpful and insightful, so some of the best jobs for them include: * [Counselor](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/therapist/) * [Writer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/writer/) * [Scientist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/scientist/) * [Librarian](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/librarian/) * [Psychologist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/psychologist/) 3. Mastermind (INTJ) The person who’s an INTJs is usually comfortable on their own, quiet, and reserved. Because socializing can be a drain on their energy, they need to take time to recharge alone. Ideas and theories interest INTJs, and you’ll often find them questioning the why of things, or wondering how things work or turn out the way they do. Because of these questions, they develop strengths in planning and strategizing, and they avoid situations and options that are uncertain. The talent people with this personality type show for recognizing connections, and the skills they have for intuitive and practical thinking make them natural problem-solvers. If you’re an INTJ, some great careers based on your personality type include: * [Musical performer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/musician/) * [Photographer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/photographer/) * [Financial advisor](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/financial-advisor/) * [Marketing manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/marketing-manager/) * [Teacher](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/teacher/) * [Physical therapist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/physical-therapist/) 4. Giver (ENFJ) If you’re a people person, there’s a good chance you might be an ENFJ. This personality type is extroverted, idealistic, highly principled and ethical. ENFJs find it easy to make connections with other people, and they often trust their intuition, imaginations, and feelings. Because they have tremendous drive but are still empathetic to the needs of the people around them and want to make the world a better place, they are natural-born leaders. Look at these career options if you’re an ENFJ: * [Guidance counselor](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/school-counselor/) * [Sales manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/sales-manager/) * [HR director](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/hr-director/) * [Art director](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/artistic-director/) * [PR manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/public-relations-manager/) 5. Craftsman (ISTP) ISTPs’ personality traits aren’t recognizable as easily as some others’, and anticipating their reactions can be a bit of a gamble. While they’re typically rational and logical, they can also be spontaneous and enthusiastic, and they’re often unpredictable, spontaneous, but they often keep those traits to themselves. At work, they’re great troubleshooters. Solving problems comes naturally to them because they’re often quiet and observant, and they can be great working in teams when necessary. ISTPs tend to enjoy analytical or technical tasks and, and with their aptitude for problem-solving, they are a great fit in these fields: * [Technician](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/maintenance-technician/) * [Construction worker](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/construction-worker/) * [Engineer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/engineering/) * [Inspector](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/quality-inspector/) 6. Provider (ESFJ) ESFJs are social butterflies who need connection, interaction with others, and who love to make other people happy. You can often find them loving the spotlight as the center of attention, and they enjoy planning events and get togethers for the people they care about. This personality looks for cooperation and harmony at work, and they’ll often do well in careers that let them look after social situations because they naturally pick up on social cues, and they’re sensitive to the needs of others. If you’re an ESFJ, some careers you may want to consider are: * [Office manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/office-manager/) * [Technical support specialist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/it-support/) * [Psychologist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/psychologist/) * [Child care provider](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/child-care/) * [Police officer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/police-officer/) 7. Idealist (INFP) A person that falls into the INFP type is generally quiet, avoids talking much about themselves, and likes spending time alone in quiet places - they’re definitely introverts. INFPs like analyzing signs and symbols and they regularly get lost in their imagination and daydreams. At the workplace, INFPs look for new things to learn and for ways they can change the world. They have the ability to bring enthusiasm and real intensity to projects they’re working on, but because of their solitary nature, they will need to recharge sooner than a lot of people. Some careers you may want to consider if you’re an INFP include: * [Copywriter](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/writer/) * [HR manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/hr-manager/) * [Physical therapist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/physical-therapist/) * [Mental health professional](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/psychologist/) * [Artist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/photographer/) * [Photographer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/photographer/) 8. Performer (ESFP) ESFPs are warm, generous, friendly, upbeat, fun, and they like to learn and share what they learn with others. ESFPs are also sympathetic and genuinely care about other people's well-being. While ESFPs are born to be in the spotlight at center stage, they can thrive in any job with excitement and diversity, and where they have the opportunity to socialize. Some ideal ESFP careers are: * [Event planner](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/event-planner/) * [PR manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/public-relations-manager/) * [Sales representative](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/sales-representative/) * [Cosmetologist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/cosmetologist/) * [Flight attendant](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/flight-attendant/) * [Physical therapist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/physical-therapist/) 9. Champion (ENFP) This personality type is the most individualistic. ENFPs are always working to craft their own looks, methods, actions, habits and ideas, and they refuse to be told who they are. While they’re individuals, they are also intuitive and enjoy being around others, and they have a habit of using their intuition and feelings when they’re dealing with other people. The individualistic nature of ENFPs and their flexibility means they’re motivated more by personal goals than money, and that they excel in flexible workplaces. Some great career options for ENFPs include: * [Actor](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/actor/) * [Art Director](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/artistic-director/) * [Musician](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/musician/) * [Product manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/product-manager/) * [Elementary school teacher](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/elementary-teacher/) * [Massage therapist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/massage-therapist/) * [Social worker](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/social-worker/) 10. Doer (ESTP) People with an ESTP personality crave social interaction, feelings, emotions, and freedom, but also love logical processes and reasoning. They’re passionate and are always looking for new opportunities, and they often succeed because of their energy toward this. ESTPs are logical thinkers who like using data and patterns to make decisions, and at work they’re diligent and can overcome challenges, but routines can bore them quickly. Some ideal careers for ESTPs include: * [Firefighter](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/firefighter/) * [Paramedic](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/emt/) * [Creative director](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/creative-director/) * [Project coordinator](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/project-coordinator/) * [Construction manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/construction-manager/) 11. Supervisor (ESTJ) ESTJs often find themselves in leadership roles with people looking up to them because they’re organized, dedicated, honest, dignified, traditional and believers in doing what they believe is right and socially acceptable. They’re also methodical, organized, dedicated, reliable and direct. At work, ESTJs are dedicated and hardworking, and they’re great with routines and follow procedures and guidelines closely. Some great options ESTJs should consider for a career include: * [Director of Finance](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/director-of-finance/) * [Pharmacist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/pharmacist/) * [Athletic Director](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/athletic-director/) * [Financial officer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/finance-officer/) * [Hotel manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/hotel-general-manager/) * [Real estate agent](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/real-estate-agent/) 12. Commander (ENTJ) People with the ENTJ personality type are rational and logical, and they tend to focus externally on the surrounding things. ENTJs love a challenge and because they also tend to be charismatic and confident, they’re natural leaders. Because ENTJs have a knack for making decisions and considering options quickly, they’re great at identifying inefficiencies and problem-solving. Goal-setting, planning and organization are also strengths they use to get things done at work. Some ideal careers for ENTJs are: * [Business unit manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/business-unit-manager/) * [Public relations specialist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/public-relations-specialist/) * [Mechanical engineer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/mechanical-engineer/) * [Financial analyst](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/financial-analyst/) * [Construction manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/construction-manager/) * [Real estate appraiser](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/real-estate-appraiser/) 13. Thinker (INTP) The INTP type is the most logical, and they have great pattern recognition. Combined, these traits make them likely to be creative and great at reading people. In the workplace, INTPs avoid routine work. They prefer roles where they can be creative and solve problems, and they’re great to have around when unexpected problems come up. INTPs creativity and intelligence set them up ideally for roles as: * [Professor](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/professor/) * [Writer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/writer/) * [Biomedical engineer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/biomedical-engineer-resume/) * [Marketing consultant](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/digital-marketing-consultant/) * [Web developer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/web-developer/) 14. Nurturer (ISFJ) ISFJs are generous people who love giving and value harmony and cooperation. They’re sensitive, in tune with other people, genuine, warm, and kind-hearted. People with this personality type have a great work ethic, and they can be counted on to complete their duties. They’re dedicated employees, conscientious in their work, and they look to make sure their workplaces are organized and that the guidelines are being followed. Ideal careers for this personality type are: * [Accountant](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/cpa/) * [Financial clerk](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/finance-clerk/) * [Bank teller](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/bank-teller/) * [Research analyst](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/data-analyst/) * [Administrative manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/administrative-manager/) * [Photographer](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/photographer/) * [Elementary teacher](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/elementary-teacher/) 15. Visionary (ENTP) ENTPs are a unique bunch who often don’t like small talk and can have a hard time in some social situations. That said, they’re very intelligent and knowledgeable, so they need constant high-level mental stimulation. These are big-idea people who can’t be asked to perform repetitive tasks or stick to routines. ENTPs excel at conceptual work and problem-solving, and work best on their own or in non-hierarchical settings. The careers that are best suited for ENTP personalities include: * [Attorney](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/attorney/) * [Copywriter](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/writer/) * [Financial planner](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/certified-financial-planner/) * [Psychologist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/psychologist/) * [Systems analyst](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/system-analyst/) * [Creative director](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/creative-director/) 16. Composer (ISFP) The ISFP's personality is warm and approachable, they make friends easily, and they’re fun to be around, but they are also actually introverts. They're full of life and love meeting new people, but they also love being on their own. At work, they’d rather be left to work on their own at their own pace. They also value harmony in the workplace and will try to avoid confrontation and keep their opinions to themselves. Some great career choices for ISFPs are: * [Bookkeeper](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/bookkeeper/) * [Social media manager](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/social-media-manager/) * [Doctor](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/doctor/) * [Veterinarian](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/veterinary-nurse/) * [Social worker](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/social-worker/) * [Occupational therapist](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/occupational-therapist/) Going over the list of personality types, you can see that each one is unique and has its own qualities. Every personality type has strengths that are perfect for some roles, but that would make doing certain other roles a trial, at best. No one personality is better than the other, but it’s important to recognize which one you are. Once you do, you can look for career options where you’re maximizing your strengths rather than trying to shoehorn yourself into a role you’re bound not going to like. Taking a Myers-Briggs personality test, or any other personality test can be a great way to get ahead in your career or to start looking for a new one. It’s one step in getting you to the success you want to achieve. We’ve helped 1000+ people just like you find that [success](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/) through our [career counseling service](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/). Whether you need help looking at the direction to go, in the job[ search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/) stage, [prepping for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), or while you’re trying to[ negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of the job or compensation, we’ve got experts that are ready to give you advice and help you strategize your next move. Takeaways * The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test is a great tool to help you quickly narrow and hone in on the right career options * There are 16 unique personality types * Each personality type has its own strengths that make people with those characteristics ideal for different roles * Finding yourself in a role that’s not suitable for your MBTI personality can be a real drain on your energy * Roles that match your MBTI personality type can be great as you’ll thrive there and can springboard up in your career

Kevin Roy
Nov 18, 2022 12 min read
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Resume Advice
How to Add Self Taught Programmer on Your Resume

Nowadays, more and more programmers are self-taught. Many of them don’t see [value in a university education](https://enhancv.com/blog/resume-education-section/), as it is expensive, and whether it gets you started in your career is uncertain. Luckily, that opinion is shared with many employers, as a computer science degree on a resume becomes less and less important for them. Actually, in some cases employers value self-taught programmers even more, as it takes a great amount of determination and will to teach yourself how to code. But how to list that you are a self-taught programmer on your resume, so that you get the best result? We are going to go through the two most important questions on the topic to get you prepared for that: * What does it mean to be a self-taught programmer? * How to add self-taught programmer on your resume? If you have some doubts about your overall resume performance, [you should definitely check out our Resume Builder, and create a unique and eye-catching design in no time](https://enhancv.com/resume-builder/). But if you are ready to learn how to add self taught programmer on your resume, stick around. What does it mean to be a self-taught programmer? First things first, let’s define what a self-taught programmer means. Typically, a self-taught programmer does not list a university/college degree in computer science, or other tech-related subject, or even does not have a degree at all. A self-taught programmer usually learns how to code while working a regular job, or while going to school, or while taking care of their family. This can be considered as a great asset by hiring managers, because you not only have the determination to learn how to code on your own, but you also show great time management skills and motivation. Something you might experience as a self-taught programmer is the [imposter syndrome](https://enhancv.com/blog/imposter-syndrome-at-work/). That’s the feeling that you get when you are unsure of your abilities, and you ask yourself what you will do when people find out that you are self-taught. You might feel like you don’t belong, as you don’t have a degree, but you should block these thoughts of yours. You can check out any forum, and see how any programmer, no matter the experience, still can struggle with the simplest tasks. How to add self-taught programmer on your resume? Now that you understand what a self-taught programmer on your resume is, it’s time to understand the key aspects of listing it correctly. List your experience, if you have any Any relevant experience would be appreciated by an employer more than a degree in computer science. A degree only shows a potential employer that you can pass an exam, but an actual experience shows them that you can do the job. That’s why, from any company’s perspective, it makes much more sense to hire someone with [experience and without a degree](https://enhancv.com/blog/incomplete-degree-on-resume/), rather than someone with a degree but without any experience. However, getting experience might be tough, [you will probably have to volunteer at local meetups and hackathons](https://enhancv.com/blog/volunteering-on-resume/). But that can be often really fun, and it would help you understand the field and create connections. Once you get your experience, make sure you list in the work experience section of your resume. [Learn more about listing entries in it here](https://enhancv.com/blog/resume-work-experience/). Build a portfolio A great thing to add to your programming resume, no matter if you have experience or not, or if you have a degree or are self-taught, is a portfolio. In any case, a portfolio allows your potential employer to see your work in action. A GitHub profile with constant activity would make your potential employer jump up and down, and give you a call right after they spend some time browsing with interest. But your portfolio should also have some structure. As a self-taught programmer, you probably have lots of abandoned repositories which you used once or twice for minor tasks from an online course. Having too much of these might come across as off putting, and your potential employer might decide that you leave projects halfway done. Instead of that, try creating a larger scale project which you improve and upgrade constantly with [every new skill you acquire](https://enhancv.com/resume-skills/). Show you are passionate and proactive We already discussed that experience is more valued than a degree from employers. But the truth is, passion and proactivity trumps both of them. It does not matter whether you have a degree or not, and whether you have experience or not. You need to convince your potential employer that you are passionate about programming. And no matter your qualifications, passion and proactivity can be shown mainly in just one way – [through your side projects](https://enhancv.com/blog/projects-on-resume/). So make sure you focus greatly on your portfolio and get it just right. Takeaways We are all done, now you know how to add self-taught programmer on your resume. Let’s go through the steps you need to take to get the best result: * **List any relevant experience you have** – it is valued much more than a degree, as it shows that you can actually do the job, rather than that you can take an exam * **Build a portfolio** – preferably GitHub, where you can show your activity on various projects. Try to get rid of any abandoned repositories and stir the hiring manager’s attention towards big projects that you updated constantly with newly acquired skills * **Show you are passionate and proactive** – that’s what is more important, as your passion can trump both experience and a degree. The best way to show your passion and proactivity is through your portfolio, so focus greatly on that Now that you know all that, it is time for you to add your self-taught programming knowledge on your resume and get your dream job.

Kal Dimitrov
Nov 18, 2022 5 min read