Home > 
Blog > 
Ace the Interview

Ace the Interview

A collection of 77 posts
Article image
Ace the Interview
How to Write a Resignation Letter (Templates Included)

You are ready to leave your old job and dive into new opportunities in your career. And you might have heard that a resignation letter is important in these moments. But what raises quite a few questions – what is a resignation letter, why is it important, and how to write one when you need it? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.And once we have the answers to all these questions, we are going to leave you off with a template for a resignation letter, as well as a great example of one. So, if you are ready to learn how to use a resignation letter to leave your old job, let’s dive in. What is a resignation letter? A resignation letter is a formal document that notifies your current employer about your decision to leave your job. It formalizes your departure and can be submitted either by email, or as a printed letter. Your resignation letter serves as a written notice for your departure from the company, and provides any details about it, including date of resignation and the end date of your employment. Should you write a resignation letter? Writing a resignation letter is the professional thing to do when leaving a job, as it officially gives notice to your superiors that you are leaving your job, and a replacement should be found to take on your responsibilities. And even though most employers don't require a resignation letter with their contacts, it is still a good idea to write one for 4 simple reasons: 1. **It creates a paper trail** – even if a resignation letter is not required, you would want to leave a paper trail for your departure, which will also help with the paperwork around your final paycheck and transition of your responsibilities 2. **It is the professional thing to do** – depending on where you work, it might be expected of you to provide a resignation letter, even if it is not a legal requirement. Just to be sure, you can ask around and contact someone who has left the company recently and see whether they submitted a resignation letter 3. **It might help manage the conversation** – telling your manager about your departure might feel awkward, and a great way to make things a little smoother is by emailing your resignation letter before your meeting, so that your manager would know what the meeting is about and would have a few minutes to process the information 4. **Helps you control the message about your departure** – writing a letter of resignation can help you be clear about when you are leaving and why. If you are worried that your manager might still spin your leaving in a way that suits them, you can also send the letter out to HR or the upper management What to include in a resignation letter? When you write your resignation letter, you need to make sure it sounds professional. It needs all the important information about your departure, but lengthy explanations are unnecessary. Here is what your resignation letter should include: * **Your intent to resign** – your letter should start and be clear about your decision to resign * **Your last day of employment** – it is essential to provide information about the last day you plan to work at the company * **An offer to assist with the transition** – often employees often to help by recruiting or training a replacement for their position, which leaves the feeling of closure and a sense of respect in both the employer and the employee * **Any question you may have** – don’t be afraid to ask any question about your final pay or benefits in your resignation letter * [Your contact information](https://enhancv.com/blog/contact-information-on-resume/) – include your personal contact information so that the company can easily get in touch with you * **Signature (optional)** – this one is only applicable if you are using a hard copy of your resignation letter * **Thank the employer (optional)** – if you want to make sure you leave things off on a positive note, you can always thank the employer for all the opportunities and experiences gained at the company, and how you enjoyed your time there How to write a resignation letter? Now you know what your resignation letter should include, so let’s take a look at the overall structure it should follow: * **Contact information** – A written letter should include your employer’s and your contact information, and the data of the letter, all before the start of the actual letter. If you have chosen to write it as an email, you can only leave your contact information, but move it under your signature and name at the bottom, and move the date to the subject line * Greeting – Address the resignation letter to your manager – Dear Mr./Mrs./Ms. [Name] * Paragraph 1 – Notify your manager about your resignation from your job and state your last day of employment. This gives the employer an official notice for your personal file * Paragraph 2 (optional) – You can mention the reason for your departure, but it is not required. If you decide to write one, make sure it is positive one, like starting a new job, or going back to school * Paragraph 3 (optional) – If you are able to, offer to assist with the transition by recruiting or training a replacement for your position * Paragraph 4 (optional) – Mention your gratitude and appreciation for the opportunity of working in the company. You can go in more detail, if you would like, with something that you found especially rewarding * Closing – Use a professional sign-off, such as “Sincerely” or “Regards” * Signature – If you are using a hard copy for your resignation letter, you can take the chance to include your handwritten signature, followed by your names. However, if you are sending out an email, just your names would do fine, but don’t forget to follow them with your contact information How to format a resignation letter? Resignation letters should be simple, short and should look professional. To do so, stick to the basics: * Make your resignation at most 1 page long * [Use a traditional font like Times New Roman, Arial, or Calibri](https://enhancv.com/blog/resume-font/) * Keep your font size between 10 and 12pt * Make your letter single-spaced with a space between each paragraph * [Use one-inch margins](https://enhancv.com/blog/resume-margins/) * Align text to the left Resignation letter templateResignation letter exampleTakeaways We are all done, now you know how to write a professional resignation letter. Remember to pay special attention to the important things like intent to resign, last day of employment, and an offer to assist with the transition. Now go get your resignation letter ready, and move on to your next job opportunity.

Kal Dimitrov
Nov 18, 2022 5 min read
Article image
Ace the Interview
How to Write a Professional Business Letter Template

If you've ever wondered how to send a professional communication with your boss, then a business letter is exactly what you need. A business letter is a professional form of communication which can be incredibly beneficial when drafting a formal correspondence. An effective business letter is a concise, specific document that addresses a specific purpose. From cover letters to recommendations, there are several types of letters that fall under the business letter umbrella. Knowing how to draft a correspondence, using proper business letter format, can help you look polished and professional.If you're interested in upping your game in creating better business letters, you should also speak to a[ career counselor at Enhancv](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/). It's always good to get some advice on how to present yourself in a business atmosphere, and our career counselors have lots of experience in advising professionals to excel in a business atmosphere. What is a business letter? A business letter is professional correspondence for the purpose of disseminating information. There are many types of letters which fall under the business letter banner, including: * [A cover letter](https://enhancv.com/blog/tag/cover-letter-help/) * Sales letter * [Leave notice](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-submit-a-two-weeks-notice-letter/) * Recommendation and[ reference letters](https://enhancv.com/blog/everything-about-reference-letters-writing-or-requesting/) * Thank-you letters I like to think of business letters as a general term to explain many types of letters. All business letters follow the same typical format, but differ greatly on the content placed inside. You can express a wide gamut of ideas and emotions within a business letter, and therefore, two business letters may share drastically different concepts. Let's look at an example of a business letter template, and as you examine it, you can gain some understanding of how the template works. After writing a few business letters, you'll begin to master the formatting. Business letter templates Each business letter follows the same typical format, but don't think of it as a hindrance when writing a professional letter. Within this format, there is a lot of room for creativity and the ability to express yourself in the written form. Let's examine a standard business letter template: Sender's address and information * Your name * Your street address * City, State, Zip Code * Your Phone number * Your email address The first thing that you should put on any formal business letter is your contact information. Include your name, the address that you live in, including city, state, and even possibly country, your phone number, and your email address. You can also include a link to your own personal website or portfolio. Date Including a date is great for both parties, as you have a record of when the letter was sent, while the addressee of the letter has access to supporting details, like the time frame to respond to the letter. Separate the date from the sender's information by using a blank line. You can do this by pressing "enter" or "return", depending on the word processing programs you use. Also, after you write the date, include another blank line. Recipient's contact information * Recipient's name * Their title * The name of the company that they work for * Recipient's address, * City, state, and Zip code The difference between a formal letter and a memo is that a business letter is addressed to a specific person, while a memo may be more general. That's why it's important to include the recipient's name, title, and company name at the beginning of the letter. You can choose to either include the recipient address. Salutation Dear Mr./Ms. Begin the main body of your letter with a salutation, a short phrase which dedicates a letter to a specific person. One of the best salutations is "Dear Mr./Ms." followed by the last name of the letter's recipient. Read more:[ Cover Letter Salutation That Entices the Recruiter to Learn More About You](https://enhancv.com/blog/cover-letter-salutation/) Body of the letter The body of the letter points to the specific reason for why you're writing the letter. Here are some tips when crafting the body of a business letter: * Always state the purpose of the letter in the first paragraph. * In subsequent paragraphs, provide information and points of clarification on your main point. * Your last paragraph should be a complimentary close, the point at which you thank the reader for taking the time out of their busy schedule to look over your proposal. It should also restate the purpose of the letter. Closing salutation Do you want to end the letter strongly? If you do, then you should consider the perfect closing salutation for your letter. A closing salutation is a one line sign off that ends a letter. Here are the most [common sign-offs](https://enhancv.com/blog/cover-letter-ending/) for a letter: * Sincerely, * Respectfully, * Best regards, * Cordially, * Yours truly, Related:[ How to Write a Cover Letter – Writing Guide + Examples & Downloadable Templates](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-write-a-cover-letter/) Additional information you could add If you own your own business, which has its own distinct logo, you can include that logo on business letterhead. This creates a sharp, eye-catching letter which the recipient is sure to read. You may also want to end your letter with a handwritten signature, as this shows that a distinct level of care has been put into the letter. As well, you can mention specific other documents which you've attached to the business letter. How to format a business letter Similarly to composing yourself professionally in the workplace, formatting also plays a role in how your letter is received. If there are a lot of grammatical errors, or if you use a hard-to-read font, the recipient may not be able to fully read or comprehend the letter. That's why it's in your best interest to follow some formatting rules listed below: * **Choose an appropriate font**: Although you may appreciate a decorative font, with lots of serifs and flourishes, it may be best to just stick with a simple font, like Times New Roman font or Arial. Ultimately, you don't want the font to take attention away from the content of the letter. * **Keep it professional and avoid slang**: Regardless of whether you know the person well or not, try to avoid common slang or jargon in your professional letter. Remember, the letter is an official correspondence, and, therefore, should be written in a professional manner. * **Run your document through a grammar and spell checker**: it is always a good idea to run any of the information through a grammar checker and spell checker to make sure that the letter is free from typos and errors. Some of the most popular grammar checkers include ProWritingAid and Grammarly, but many word processors have their own grammar checking applications, including Microsoft Word and Google Docs. * **Keep the document single spaced and left justify**: One of the last things that you can check over is the spacing and paragraph justification, which side of the page the paragraphs are positioned towards. Using a single spacing can aid in readability. Tips to write an effective business letter Below, you'll find a few tips about how to properly write a business letter. If you follow the tips below, you can create an engaging letter which will grab the attention of your reader: Keep several templates for future business letters I am a fan of keeping master templates of popular documents, as this allows me to shave down on the time it takes to create a new business letter. For example, if you're applying for a lot of jobs and sending out several cover letters, it's a good idea to have a[ general cover letter template](https://enhancv.com/blog/general-cover-letter/) ready to go. This template can have all your information written in the letter, including a simple format to follow which allows you to plug-in information about the employer and details about their organization. You always want to create tailored and specific business letters, as generic business letters may show that you don't care enough to create a new letter. Differ your letter between an email and a physical letter In this highly digital age, the common form of communication is through email, rather than providing someone with the physical copy. You should differ a written business letter from an email business letter. Here are some things that you should include in an email business letter that you would necessarily include in a written one: * Remember to include a specific subject line to the email which points to the purpose of the letter. * Include any links in the email. * You can also move your address and phone number underneath your signature. Takeaways * A business letter is a general-purpose professional letter which is written to a specific person. * Each business letter follows a specific format, which is easy to follow. * Always check your business letters for spelling and grammatical errors. If you're interested in taking your business letter writing to the next level, [speak to a career counselor at Enhancv](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/). They can help to address any questions that you have, as well as providing you with important details to include in your next business letter.

Dave Van Kooten
Nov 18, 2022 7 min read
Article image
Ace the Interview
How to Write a Recommendation Letter in 4 Simple Steps with Template and Sample Letters (LinkedIn Reference Included)

Wondering whether the reference letter you’ve been asked to write is going to help that person you know, respect, and wish the best for? Good, they put their trust in you, and it makes sense you want to do right by them. Anybody can write a ho-hum letter that a hiring manager will glance at and never think about again. In fact, we know that most people do. But you want your letter to stand out and do what you intend: get someone hired. That’s what we’ve written this guide for. We’re going to lay out a few simple rules you can follow to avoid the common mistakes that make for a humdrum reference letter and instead write one that has great impact. A recommendation letter is usually one of the very last parts in a job search. Congrats if that’s where you are, you’re on your way to reaching your career goals! But if you’re looking ahead and want help with some of the crucial earlier steps toward career success, check out our [career counseling](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/) service. We’ve helped thousands of people along the way succeed in their [job search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/), [prep for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), [negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of their contracts, and otherwise [hit their career targets](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/). Get in touch with us If you want to do a deep dive on informational interviews, or if you're curious about other ways to better navigate your career path. Recommendation letter templateRecommendation letter sampleThere you go, a template and a sample you can use to write your own reference letter! Just copy and paste it into your word processor and make the changes you need to suit the candidate it’s for. If you plan to copy and paste one of our examples, remember these formatting tips, too: * Use standard margins (between 1 - 1 ½”) * Single spacing for the paragraphs with an extra space between them and each of the address sections * Use a clear and readable font, like Arial or Cambria, at 11-12 point * Combine these so it doesn’t look cramped and so everything fits on 1 page We can help with [formatting resumes](https://enhancv.com/blog/cover-letter-format/) and [spacing cover letters](https://enhancv.com/blog/cover-letter-spacing-guide/) too if you have any questions. What is a recommendation letter A recommendation letter (_aka_ a ‘reference letter’ or a ‘letter of reference’) is a letter written by a person of standing or authority (the referee) in support of a candidate’s qualification and suitability for a specific job. It should go without saying, but it’s pretty important: the referee should know the candidate personally and _have a high opinion of them_. It’s also expected that the referee should have some respectability and clout. They’re usually in a position of seniority, like at the level of a team lead, manager, or professor, depending on when and where the candidate worked with or for them. And lastly, the author of the reference letter should read the job ad so they can describe how the candidate’s work or academic experience, skills, and performance are relevant and make them a great fit for that job. And that’s the upshot: a reference letter is a written personal reference in support of someone for a job. How to write a recommendation letter A great reference letter will use the format we showed you at the top of the article. There are four basic elements and they should be presented in order for best effect: 1. Open with a show stopping Intro 2. Establish your relationship with the candidate 3. Include job-specific supporting details 4. Close with a call to action Step 1. The intro The intro is super important. It will literally make or break the reference letter. A hiring manager gets a pile of reference letters for every round of hiring, and if you don’t grab their attention in the first couple of sentences they’ll set it aside and forget about it. You need to be the person who stops them in their tracks. Most reference letters start out in similar ways. The most complimentary way to describe them is: unengaging. They might say something like:This won’t lose anyone the job, but compared to what we suggested in our sample, it’s not turning any heads, either. Judge for yourself. See the difference? If you had someone writing a reference letter for you, which would you rather? Don’t limit yourself to just that option, though. What you mention in the intro for a letter of reference can be anything attention-grabbing, including: * Phrase the opening in a novel or unexpected that will make them want to know more * Say something amazing about the candidate's qualities * Include an impressive fact about the applicant * Describe accolades or awards the candidate won Step 2. Your relationship Here’s where a good reference letter establishes not just what the relationship was, but how it went. And FYI, it should have gone well! A typical reference letter will say something like:We think you should amp things up a bit, though. Tell the hiring recruiter in the most emphatic and engaged way, while still being honest, how you worked together but ALSO how well it went. Here’s what we mean, again from our sample above:If you’re writing a reference letter, the assumption is it went well. So let them know it did in an honest and human way, not just using cold, professional, business-talk. Step 3. Job-specific support This is where it’s going to be key that you read the job ad you’re writing in support of. You want to target one or more parts of that job and show how they’d be great at it. It’s the kiss of death in a reference letter when the author gives some generic words of praise. It’s like manager-code for “Meh, he was alright, not my problem anymore…” Look at what a regular recommendation would say:This is all well and good. But it’s literally the basics that anyone in the role is expected to do, which is not going to make your candidate stand out. Compare that to how we suggest you describe their qualifications:If you were reading about these two candidates, which one of them shines brighter to you than the other. It’s a no-brainer. The little bit of extra effort to remember a few accomplishments and how they apply to the new role will make a huge difference. You can even ask the candidate themselves to supply a few choice tidbits to make remembering easier. Step 4. A call to action Signing off in a recommendation letter is the last chance you have to leave an impression on the hiring manager. Use the opportunity to the fullest to accomplish what you’ve set out to do. A typical reference letter would close with a simple and standard valediction. Something like:Again, there’s nothing going on in that example that’s bad. But, there’s nothing great there either. Make the most of these last few words to impress on the Hiring Manager that you believe in the person you’re writing about, that they’re worth your time, and that they’re worth theirs too. A call to action can make this difference by showing that you’re ready to spend more time on this, and it sets the stage for the next step. See for yourself: In this case, it’s clear that you’re behind the candidate 100% and that they’re really noteworthy among all the other applicants. Why else would you be willing to take the time out of your day for their benefit? Following these 4 simple steps will make sure that the next reference letter you write for someone will have all the hallmarks needed to be sure they get that job. But, in case you’re reading this because you’re in the job search stage and started thinking about [how to ask for a reference letter](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-get-a-job-referral/) when the time comes, we can help with that too. If so, this is also a great time to make sure you know [what to put on your resume](https://enhancv.com/blog/good-characteristics-to-put-resume/) and [what a great cover letter looks like](https://enhancv.com/blog/what-does-a-cover-letter-look-like/). Writing a LinkedIn reference At the bottom of everyone’s profile on LinkedIn, there’s a spot where people can write brief endorsements, like little reference letters. They’re kind of like online reviews, but instead of letting everyone know how that restaurant kept you waiting so long for appetizers, you say good things about a person you worked with! These references aren’t nearly as important as [writing a good resume](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-write-a-resume/) or a [strong cover letter](https://enhancv.com/blog/what-is-a-cover-letter/), but recruiters and hiring managers will often peruse them when they're considering a person for a job. They can offer just that little bit of personal insight and support that makes the difference between candidates. When you decide, or someone asks you to write one of these, LinkedIn will prompt you to write about: * Your relationship. As in, whether you were their manager, coworker, or another one of the options they offer in the drop-down. * The person’s position when you worked together. * Your recommendation. This is the brief note (no more than 3,000 characters—but less in more here) about the person’s work habits, qualifications, general awesomeness. That last one, the recommendation, is really the key part. But that blank dialogue box can be intimidating. Keep the following 5 points in mind, though, and you’ll write a knock-out reference that’ll impress whoever reads it. 1. **Start with a great hook** Use the first line to hook the audience and get them wanting to know more. 2. **Describe your relationship** Give the reader some context on how you know the person, and how that went - provided it went well. There’s no need to stick to cold, clinical descriptions here, be honest and human, just like we suggest for reference letters. 3. **Let them shine** Since you’re recommending them, you probably think well of them. Take a couple of sentences to share a standout trait of theirs that everyone would appreciate. 4. **Include a personal touch** We say it a lot here at Enhancv, employers don’t hire skills, they hire people. That is, most people want to work with someone they enjoy AND who gets the job done, so say something that lets everyone know the person is great to work with, not just great at their job. 5. **Close with a crystal clear recommendation** Don’t underestimate the impact of a clear, unambiguous recommendation. Sign off with a final line that makes it clear that you give your unequivocal support to the person. Takeaways * A recommendation letter is the same thing as a’ reference letter’ or a ‘letter of reference/recommendation’ * It’s a 1-page letter outlining why you think a candidate would be a great fit for a job * A great opening line is key to grabbing the hiring manager’s attention * Let the person you’re writing for really standout - use positive, human language, not clinical business-talk * Share specific examples of how what they did for you proves they can do the job they’re applying to * Always close with a call to action that shows the candidate is worth your time We’ve helped 1000+ people just like you find [success](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/success-stories/) in the hiring process through our [career counseling service](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/). Whether you need help on the job[ search](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/job-search/) stage, [prepping for interviews](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/mock-interview-service/), or while you’re trying to[ negotiate ](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/salary-negotiation-service/)the details of the job or compensation, we’ve got experts that are ready to give you advice and help you strategize your next move.

Kevin Roy
Nov 18, 2022 9 min read
Article image
Ace the Interview
How to Send an Introduction Email to a Recruiter (Sample Included)

Emails are the most common form of communication in the business world, and a great way to start a communication about a position that you desire to get. And a great way to introduce yourself as a candidate for an open position is to write an introduction email. The problem is, most professionals receive tons of emails on a daily basis, and to capture their interest is a hard task. We are here to help you, in this article, we are going to explore the following questions: * Why would you want to send an introduction email? * How to write an introduction email? And we are going to leave you off with a template for you to use, as well as an introduction email example to get you started. The next step after your introduction email would be to send out your application documents, so make sure they are as good as possible. [Check out our Resume Builder](https://enhancv.com/resume-builder/) and [Cover letter builder, and create a unique design in no time](https://enhancv.com/cover-letter-builder/). But if you are ready to learn how to write an introduction email, stick around. Why you’d want to send an Introduction email? Contacting someone you don’t know via email might seem awkward, or even scary, but it is a great way to start off a communication. The most common reasons for you to write an introduction email are: * Asking about [more information about a job position](https://enhancv.com/blog/resume-work-experience/) * Asking for advice * Trying to sell a product or service No matter your reason, you need to make sure you can catch the recipient’s attention, and engage their interest. How to write introduction email Now that you understand why you need an introduction email, it is time to learn how to write one. You can do so in just a few quick steps. Find a contact that connects you with the recipient The first step to your introduction email requires some research on your part. A great way to capture the recipient’s attention is to mention a mutual contact of yours. It might be someone who works in the same company as them, or [someone who they know through college](https://enhancv.com/blog/resume-education-section/), or any other way. A great place to [look for mutual connections is within the recipient’s LinkedIn profile](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-to-put-linkedin-on-your-resume/). If you find a mutual contact, try asking them if they would be willing to introduce you, or let you mention them in your introduction email. Use a good subject line When it comes to writing your introduction email, the first and most important step you need to take is to give it a clear subject line. That’s what would make the recipient open your email, or ignore it. You need to make sure your subject line is professional, informative, and brief. It needs to show the recipient exactly why you are reaching out to them. Write a proper greeting After the recipient have opened your email, you need to start off with a proper greeting. You might think that you can use the same greeting no matter what, but that is not entirely true. If you are contacting someone in the industry of finance or law, you should stick to the traditional “Dear Ms./Mrs./Mr.”, but that is not the best approach for every industry. For example, if you are reaching out to someone in the tech or media business, the much more informal “Hello” followed by their name might be perceived better. To get this right, make sure you know who you are contacting, and consider the industry they work in. Get to the reason for reaching out fast As professionals receive tons of emails on a daily basis, you would want to quickly get to the point, before you lose their interest. You can start your email with pleasantries, but make sure you keep them short. Share with them how you have their contact, and move on to the reason for contacting them. Add a call to action Once you have explained the reason for contacting the recipient, it is time for the most important part of your introduction email body – a call to action. That’s the place you need to invite them to act on your email. Keep your request brief, but specific, such as asking to meet to discuss the details about an open position, or organize a job interview. Make sure your call to action sounds like a polite request, instead of a demand. Close professionally Finishing your email professionally is just as significant as anything else, so don’t rush through it. That’s where it is essential for you to thank the recipient for their time and acknowledge their busy schedule. [Make sure you include your contact information](https://enhancv.com/blog/contact-information-on-resume/) if they want to contact you, and include any portfolio or online professional profile. Last but not least, use a professional sign-off for your email, like: * Sincerely * Regards * Best regards Introduction email samples Takeaways We are all done, now you know how to write a great introduction email. Let’s do a quick recap of everything you need to do: * Find a mutual contact – do your research and find if you have a mutual contact who can introduce you, or if they would let you use their name in your introduction email * Use a good subject line – that’s what would make the recipient open your email, or ignore it, so make sure it is brief and clear * Write a proper greeting – pick the best greeting according to the industry the recipient is working in * Quickly get to the point – don’t write long emails, as the recipient might be busy. Instead, quickly get to the reason you are reaching out to them * Add a call to action – invite the recipient to take action toward your reason for contacting them * Close professionally – make sure you thank the recipient for their time, provide your contact information, and use a professional sign-off Check out our template and example one last time, and write your own introduction email for your next opportunity.

Kal Dimitrov
Nov 18, 2022 5 min read
Article image
Ace the Interview
How to Write an Initial Message to a Hiring Manager (With Examples)

Looking to make a great first impression with a hiring manager? Send them a personalized, direct message which mentions your skills, abilities, and work experience. By sending an initial email, you can differentiate yourself from other applicants, as well as get your cover letter and resume directly in the hands of the person who needs to read it. It's not always easy to send an initial email to a hiring manager, as you may be stuck on what to say. The goal of this article is to help you find the best way to express yourself to a hiring manager. In this article, we will discuss: * The reason to send an initial message to a hiring manager * Successful email and direct message templates * How to add an eye-catching subject line * 5 tips to send an initial message to a hiring manager If you're interested in learning more about how to create a great first impression, including how to present yourself successfully in an email message,[ speak to a career counselor at Enhancv](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/). By chatting directly with a counselor, you can gain confidence and excel in your next job interview. Why send an initial message to a hiring manager? When you send an initial email message to a hiring manager, you are making yourself more memorable in their mind. Consider this: each hiring manager may go through dozens of[ resumes](https://enhancv.com/blog/how-long-should-a-resume-be/) and[ cover letters](https://enhancv.com/blog/what-is-a-cover-letter/) to find the perfect candidate for the position. But if you send an initial message, you show that you're willing to go above and beyond as a candidate. In addition, by putting yourself out there, you show that you have the work ethic to excel in the position. Email and direct message templates Email message to hiring managers: Sales PositionWhat works well in this email? It gets directly to the point, and expresses that the author of the email feels they are the best candidate for the position, backing it up by providing specific details about their work history. Initial emails are supposed to provide the recipient with a "taste" of what this person can offer to the organization, and this email provides just enough information to entice a hiring manager to pursue them more. Email to hiring manager: tech positionWhat this email does well? The author of this email takes a decisive step to show their full range of skills and abilities in such a brief space. In just 3 paragraphs, the author explains his interest in the company, as well as the range of experience he has in the IT field. Email to a hiring manager: Referral Email What does this email do well? The author of this email establishes a connection with the hiring manager by[ introducing a mutual contact](https://enhancv.com/blog/forwarding-resume-ask-friends-job-recommendation-on-email/). Most hiring managers appreciate having someone referred to them, especially if that person giving the referral is someone whose opinion they respect. LinkedIn message to a hiring manager directlyWhat works well with this message? One of the things that works really well with this email is that it focuses on the author's experience, as well as what he's passionate about. He's willing to share his portfolio, which will reflect his experience in[ creating UX designs](https://enhancv.com/resume-examples/ux-ui-designer-resume/) for websites. If this was a specific thing found in the job description, then he shows in this email how he would be a perfect fit for the position. Also, not only can you attach documents to a LinkedIn message, but you can also share about your[ LinkedIn profile](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/linkedin-profile-writing-service/). Emailing after applying If you've applied for a position, and haven't heard yet even after waiting several weeks, you might want to send out an email to check to see if you're still in the running. Try to wait at least 2 weeks before you message about your job application. Before you do this, check over the job application to make sure that there is nothing in there that says you shouldn't directly message the hiring manager. Also check to see if there is a specific date on which the job application process will close. Most applications have a start date and a closing date, so make sure that you're not responding too early before the close of the application process.What does this email do well? This email focuses in on the specific application which the author of the email sent out on July 30th. But it does more than that, as it introduces his strengths and abilities, which may give a hiring manager second thought about giving them a chance for the internship. It's written in a more formal tone, which may fit when emailing a more traditional business, like a financial institution. How to craft an eye-catching subject line Creating a great subject line can give you the opportunity to stand out among the other emails in a hiring manager's inbox. If you're looking to craft an eye-catching subject line, focus on key ideas: * Mention the position you're applying for. * If possible, give the name of somebody who is referring you to the position. * Keep the subject line brief and to the point. If you're interested in learning how to craft the perfect subject line, look through the email examples above. You can see that they are all brief, and provide the email recipient with the most information to click on the email. 5 tips to send an initial message to a hiring manager ### 1. Find the hiring manager's name and contact information The most important thing you can do is find the hiring manager's contact information and name. Try not to send a generic email salutation like "dear hiring manager", as this will look like you haven't done enough research into the position. Instead, by finding the hiring manager's name and contact information, you can personalize the email. Once you find the hiring manager's name, you should be able to find other contact information by looking on the company's website, social media platforms, or you can search for their LinkedIn profile. ### 2. Keep it brief, but to the point As you draft the email, keep it brief and to the point. Focus on your skills and abilities, as well as how you feel that you'd be a great fit in the position. Try not to go off on other topics which are not important to the email or for the position, and remember that the primary goal for the email is to set up a time for an interview. ### 3. Include your name and the position you're applying for In addition, you should also include your name, either in the email's body or as an email signature at the bottom, as well as the position that you're applying for. A HR associate may be filling several roles in their company at one time, so, to jog their memory, include the position that you will have applied for. ### 4. Include a call to action The call to action is a specific request for the recipient of the email to fulfil. The primary call to action to include at the end of an initial email to a hiring manager is to set up a[ time for an interview](https://enhancv.com/blog/example-situational-interview-questions-and-answers/). ### 5. Check for grammar or spelling mistakes The last thing you should do before clicking send is to check your email over to make sure that there are no grammar or spelling mistakes. You may have written a stellar email, but one spelling mistake can turn a hiring manager off. Download a grammar and spell checking software to make sure that everything you've written is grammatically correct. Key takeaways * Sending an initial email to a hiring manager allows you to differentiate yourself from other applicants. * Be sure to keep this initial email brief and specific to the position you're applying for. * Personalize the email by finding the name and contact information of the hiring manager. * Include a call to action at the end of your email. If you're interested in learning more about how to make a great introduction to any hiring manager, speak with a[ career counselor from Enhancv](https://enhancv.com/career-counseling/). They'll give you all the information that you need to put your best foot forward and land your dream job.

Dave Van Kooten
Nov 18, 2022 7 min read