How to Add Supplemental Information to Your Resume

What is considered supplemental information for resumes? Find out what extra you can add to your job application and how to make it professionally.

How to Add Supplemental Information to Your Resume

You can only fit a limited amount of information on a resume. Chances are, there is more to your career story than what a 1- or 2-page document can hold. Supplemental information is a powerful tool you can use to convey your positive qualities.

What do we mean by supplemental information on your resume?

Supplemental information is any additional materials, documents, or deliverables that provide extra facts to the resume. If a candidate’s situation is unique, supplemental information can help paint a better picture. It can also provide a comprehensive snapshot of your education, background, and credentials.

Why you’d want to include supplemental information with your resume

If a recruiter or hiring manager asks for information not included in the resume, you’ll need to provide supplemental information. The extra facts provide more context to your resume and elevate your brand and image.

Supplemental information for a resume is also useful for the following situations:

  • Your resume shows unemployment gaps or irregular work periods
  • You apply for a position within an undergraduate or graduate program, which requires supplemental information
  • You have licenses, certifications, or qualifications not listed in the resume
  • You have extra work experience not listed in your resume, such as an internship
  • You are a contractor or business owner with several client testimonials
  • You have published articles or books that you want to showcase

What is considered supplemental information?

What else do people consider supplemental information? Below are some common examples of supplemental information.

Letters of recommendation

You want to make a great impression with a resume, which is why you should list only positive things about yourself. Letters of recommendation are testimonials from other people about your hard work and dedication. Supplemental information can include these kind words from colleagues, professors, and mentors.

Employment gaps explanation

Sometimes an employment gap requires an explanation that will not fit on the resume. Supplemental information allows you to write out your employment gap summary. As you develop this message, it would be best to convey the skills you gained during this time.

Salary history

Workers do not normally include salary figures on a resume, which is why this history is relevant supplemental information. This information is critical to include if a salary raise is in your goals.

Specific circumstances

There will occasionally be situations that are tough to explain on a resume. Whether it is a global pandemic, a family move, or a personal health issue, it is vital to convey the reason to the hiring manager. Doing so will give them more context and increase your chances of getting hired.

Tips to send supplemental information

Here are some tips to remember before you send supplemental information.

Double-check the recipient’s details

The last thing you want to do is send your supplemental information to the wrong person. Before you send the facts, confirm that the recipient email matches the one that the recruiter provided you.

Ensure the information is up to date

You should update your supplemental documents regularly. Before you send these items to a recruiter, double-check to see if everything is up to date.

Takeaways

Supplemental information can provide meaningful context to your resume. It can explain work history gaps, special circumstances, awards, accolades, and positive qualities. You deserve to have an excellent job, and your supplemental information can help you get there.