RESUME ADVICE

Canadian Resume Format

From using British English to having a proper resume, here are the nuances to making a good Canadian resume

Canada–the land of maple syrup, moose, and long winters. It’s also the land of job opportunities large and small.

Canadian employers look at resumes in a slightly different way than American companies do. They will be able to tell if you’re an American who’s making the move up north.

If you want your resume to stand out in Canada, you’ll need to know the basics of a Canadian resume format. With these examples and our step-by-step instructions, you’ll be more impressive than poutine.

In This Guide, You’ll See:

  • A Canadian resume example for various industries
  • A guide to the Canadian resume format
  • What makes the Canadian resume different from the American resume

After you finish, you’ll be ready to move to the friendliest country in North America.

Check Out This Canadian Resume Examples

Hopefully, this inspires you!

Now let’s write your Canadian resume.

The Best Format for a Canadian Resume

Believe it or not, the best format for a Canadian resume is pretty similar to an American resume. The format is similar, and the main differences are in the smaller details.

For the general format, you want to use reverse chronological order. This system will showcase your experience and start with the most recent and relevant information.

Here are the sections of a Canadian resume:

  • A header for contact information
  • A resume profile
  • Work experience
  • Education (if necessary/applicable)
  • A list of skills
  • Additional sections like (if needed)

Each section should be succinct and to the point, but highlight your accomplishments. After all, you have done some amazing things and now is your chance to brag about them.

How to Write a Canadian Resume

When writing a Canadian resume, you’ll follow many of the same steps as you would for an American resume. The two countries share a lot in common, including resume formats.

In your header, make sure to include contact information, location, and your name. You don’t need your full address or a picture.

Resume Profile

There are two methods for a resume profile: an objective or a summary. The more experience you have, the more likely you are to put a summary. However, beginners or freshly graduated job seekers should use a resume objective.

Work Experience

This section will be the largest part of your resume. When you list your work experience in backward chronological order, employers will see your qualifications at a glance.

Education

Education is a necessary part of your resume, even if it seems as though most people don’t look at it. Make sure it’s visible but doesn’t distract from your work experience.

Applicable Skills

If you don’t have the required experience for the job, any applicable skills might help your case. Use professional language and be specific in how your skills and experience coincide with the job you’re applying to.

Extra Sections

Any extra information should go into these sections. Insert volunteer work, awards, certificates, and other relevant experience here.

What is Different From an American Resume?

Writing a Canadian resume is pretty similar to writing an American resume. However, you need to make sure that you’re doing these small things:

By doing these small things, you’ll showcase your knowledge of Canada. Any potential employers will see that you can work in any country without losing professionalism.

Final Takeaways:

  • Make sure your resume is professional and focused
  • Check your resume for Canadian spelling, measurements, and date formats
  • Follow all the regular resume tips for a stellar resume
  • Let your talents and specialties shine through
  • Keep your resume to one page

Make your move!
Your resume is an extension of yourself.
Make one that's truly you.
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Evgeni Asenov
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