Home > 
Blog > 
How to Write an Initial Message to a Hiring Manager (With Examples)

How to Write an Initial Message to a Hiring Manager (With Examples)

Looking to make a great first impression with a hiring manager? Send them a personalized, direct message which mentions your skills, abilities, and work experience.

By sending an initial email, you can differentiate yourself from other applicants, as well as get your cover letter and resume directly in the hands of the person who needs to read it.

It's not always easy to send an initial email to a hiring manager, as you may be stuck on what to say. The goal of this article is to help you find the best way to express yourself to a hiring manager.

In this article, we will discuss:

  • The reason to send an initial message to a hiring manager
  • Successful email and direct message templates
  • How to add an eye-catching subject line
  • 5 tips to send an initial message to a hiring manager

If you're interested in learning more about how to create a great first impression, including how to present yourself successfully in an email message, speak to a career counselor at Enhancv. By chatting directly with a counselor, you can gain confidence and excel in your next job interview.

Why send an initial message to a hiring manager?

When you send an initial email message to a hiring manager, you are making yourself more memorable in their mind.

Consider this: each hiring manager may go through dozens of resumes and cover letters to find the perfect candidate for the position. But if you send an initial message, you show that you're willing to go above and beyond as a candidate.

In addition, by putting yourself out there, you show that you have the work ethic to excel in the position.

Email and direct message templates

Email message to hiring managers: Sales Position

Subject line: Re: Sales Position at XYZ Machining

Dear Dianne,

I hope you are doing well. I recently applied to the sales manager's position in the Northeast region on the XYZ Machining website, but I wanted to introduce myself to you through direct message.

I'm excited about the position, and I have excelled in the last few years of my career as a sales associate, with several accolades under my belt. For the last 3 years, even in the middle of a global economic slowdown, I continued to record the highest sales each month and even set records.

I'd love for you to look through my resume and cover letter, and learn more information about who I am, especially my skills and abilities. I would also love to set up a time to interview for the position.

Sincerely,

Dan Watterworth

What works well in this email?

It gets directly to the point, and expresses that the author of the email feels they are the best candidate for the position, backing it up by providing specific details about their work history. Initial emails are supposed to provide the recipient with a "taste" of what this person can offer to the organization, and this email provides just enough information to entice a hiring manager to pursue them more.

Email to hiring manager: tech position

Subject line: Systems Analyst Application process at Neoko

Dear Sally Firestone,

I hope you are doing well. I wanted to reach out to you directly because I am excited about the position of systems analyst at Neoko Technology. Although I've applied through your company's website, I wanted to directly introduce myself through email.

I've worked in the tech industry for over a decade, and I've always had an interest in coding and setting up programs. I have skills in creating and sustaining company-wide systems, including intranets. I am a perfect fit for the job opening, as I can fill many roles within the IT industry, including cyber security.

Attached you'll find my resume and cover letter, which I believe will highlight my skills and abilities. Once you've read over that, I would love to set up a time to interview for this position, and please don't hesitate to ask if you have any more questions.

Sincerely,

Phill Topher

What this email does well?

The author of this email takes a decisive step to show their full range of skills and abilities in such a brief space. In just 3 paragraphs, the author explains his interest in the company, as well as the range of experience he has in the IT field.

Email to a hiring manager: Referral Email

Subject line: Phill Sandeski recommended I contact you

Dear Sheila,

My former colleague Phill Sandeski recommended I contact you about the opening at your company in the accounting department. He mentioned he had previously worked at your company, and that I would be a great fit for the position there.

I am a chartered professional accountant and have worked in this industry for twenty years. One thing that sets me apart from other candidates is my ability to learn on the job.

I am looking forward to hearing from you, and please let me know if you need more information. Attached to this email, you'll find my cover letter and my resume, as well as some personal achievements that I've earned throughout my 2 decades of experience.

Sincerely,

Sam Sinclair

What does this email do well?

The author of this email establishes a connection with the hiring manager by introducing a mutual contact. Most hiring managers appreciate having someone referred to them, especially if that person giving the referral is someone whose opinion they respect.

LinkedIn message to a hiring manager directly

Hello Sarah,

I hope you don't mind me reaching out to you directly through LinkedIn, but I'm applying for the graphic design position at CE Communications, and I wanted to quickly say hello.

I have 5 years of experience in graphic design, including photo editing software like Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, but my real passion now is in creating user experience (UX) optimized landing pages and websites.

Attached you'll find my portfolio, as well as a cover letter and resume. I'd love for you to look through some designs that I've created, and click through the links that I've attached to find custom-made webpages. Message me on LinkedIn or email me at samstudent@email.com, to set up a time to interview for the position.

Best regards,

Sam Student

What works well with this message?

One of the things that works really well with this email is that it focuses on the author's experience, as well as what he's passionate about. He's willing to share his portfolio, which will reflect his experience in creating UX designs for websites. If this was a specific thing found in the job description, then he shows in this email how he would be a perfect fit for the position. Also, not only can you attach documents to a LinkedIn message, but you can also share about your LinkedIn profile.

Emailing after applying

If you've applied for a position, and haven't heard yet even after waiting several weeks, you might want to send out an email to check to see if you're still in the running. Try to wait at least 2 weeks before you message about your job application.

Before you do this, check over the job application to make sure that there is nothing in there that says you shouldn't directly message the hiring manager.

Also check to see if there is a specific date on which the job application process will close. Most applications have a start date and a closing date, so make sure that you're not responding too early before the close of the application process.

Subject line: Re: Intern position at ABC Financial

Dear Phyliss Demetre,

I hope that you're doing well. On July 30, I applied for the intern position at ABC Financial. I am writing to send a follow-up to see what the application and interview process looks like, as well as to express my interest in the position.

As you mentioned in the job description, you're looking for a college graduate who is a self-starter, willing to learn on the job and develop new skills. I've recently graduated and I am looking for a summer internship to provide much needed experience. Over the last 4 years, I have developed my public speaking skills, ability to lead presentations, and persuasive sales strategies.

These skills make me an ideal candidate for the internship position as a summer financial associate. Attached, you'll find my cover letter and resume, as well as a few references.

Thank you for the time you've taken to review my application.

Best wishes,

Dave Sumpter

What does this email do well?

This email focuses in on the specific application which the author of the email sent out on July 30th. But it does more than that, as it introduces his strengths and abilities, which may give a hiring manager second thought about giving them a chance for the internship. It's written in a more formal tone, which may fit when emailing a more traditional business, like a financial institution.

How to craft an eye-catching subject line

Creating a great subject line can give you the opportunity to stand out among the other emails in a hiring manager's inbox. If you're looking to craft an eye-catching subject line, focus on key ideas:

  • Mention the position you're applying for.
  • If possible, give the name of somebody who is referring you to the position.
  • Keep the subject line brief and to the point.

If you're interested in learning how to craft the perfect subject line, look through the email examples above. You can see that they are all brief, and provide the email recipient with the most information to click on the email.

5 tips to send an initial message to a hiring manager

1. Find the hiring manager's name and contact information

The most important thing you can do is find the hiring manager's contact information and name. Try not to send a generic email salutation like "dear hiring manager", as this will look like you haven't done enough research into the position. Instead, by finding the hiring manager's name and contact information, you can personalize the email.

Once you find the hiring manager's name, you should be able to find other contact information by looking on the company's website, social media platforms, or you can search for their LinkedIn profile.

2. Keep it brief, but to the point

As you draft the email, keep it brief and to the point. Focus on your skills and abilities, as well as how you feel that you'd be a great fit in the position. Try not to go off on other topics which are not important to the email or for the position, and remember that the primary goal for the email is to set up a time for an interview.

3. Include your name and the position you're applying for

In addition, you should also include your name, either in the email's body or as an email signature at the bottom, as well as the position that you're applying for. A HR associate may be filling several roles in their company at one time, so, to jog their memory, include the position that you will have applied for.

4. Include a call to action

The call to action is a specific request for the recipient of the email to fulfil. The primary call to action to include at the end of an initial email to a hiring manager is to set up a time for an interview.

5. Check for grammar or spelling mistakes

The last thing you should do before clicking send is to check your email over to make sure that there are no grammar or spelling mistakes. You may have written a stellar email, but one spelling mistake can turn a hiring manager off.

Download a grammar and spell checking software to make sure that everything you've written is grammatically correct.

Key takeaways

  • Sending an initial email to a hiring manager allows you to differentiate yourself from other applicants.
  • Be sure to keep this initial email brief and specific to the position you're applying for.
  • Personalize the email by finding the name and contact information of the hiring manager.
  • Include a call to action at the end of your email.

If you're interested in learning more about how to make a great introduction to any hiring manager, speak with a career counselor from Enhancv. They'll give you all the information that you need to put your best foot forward and land your dream job.

Make your move!
Your resume is an extension of yourself.
Make one that's truly you.
Author image
Dave Van Kooten
Is a human resource expert that helps passionate jobseekers to put their best foot forward to prepare for an interview. He believes that success can be achieved through going out of your comfort zone.
Continue Reading
Check more recommended readings to get the job of your dreams.